Two New Irish Webinars Released - Both FREE

March is the month to celebrate being Irish! To help you do that Legacy has released two new webinars on Irish research. The two classes cover the topics of researching your Irish ancestors in US Newspapers as well as discovering what the journey was like for your immigrant ancestors. Both combine to give you richer resources to discover your elusive Irish ancestors! Both classes are presented by veteran genealogical speaker, Thomas Kemp.

The new webinars include:

Both of these webinars are FREE and will remain available at no charge to you thanks to GenealogyBank.com.

Irish Records in US Newspapers

Did you know that Irish marriage & death records were routinely published in American newspapers? That Irish passenger lists printed in US newspapers contain MORE information than were on the Federal Passenger lists? Learn how to find the ancestral home town of your ancestor when all you know was that he was “born in Ireland”.

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You Know Your Irish Ancestors Came to America, But What Was the Voyage Like?

Learn how to uncover the ‘rest of the story’ of your ancestor’s difficult voyage to America from the pages of old U.S. newspapers. Track the ship before it arrived at the departure port in Europe – during the voyage and the arrival here in America. Get the whole story.

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These webinars join 10 other excellent Irish webinars already available to members in the library: 

 Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 323 classes in the library (465 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 1,385 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

 We've got a brand new line up of speakers for 2016! All live webinars are free to watch.

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Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.


Tuesday's Tip - Don't Forget about the Legacy Home Tab

  Don't forget about the Legacy Home Tab

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Tuesday's Tip - Don't Forget about the Legacy Home Tab

There is a lot of great stuff on the Legacy Home tab which you will find all the way to the left when you first open Legacy. It's like your dashboard for news and information.

The first section, Legacy News, gives you hot links to all of our articles. You won't just find Legacy announcements here but also general genealogy articles on things like educational opportunities, methodology and new resources you might be interested in. If you click the words LEGACY NEWS it is a hot link to the Newsletter/Blog itself. There is a SUBMIT NEWS button where you can send in things you think Geoff and Marian might be interested in for the Newsletter/Blog.

  Legacy Home Tab with announcements, to-do and reminder dates

Depending on what you have selected in Options > Customize > Launch, when you click on one of the news items either the article will open in the internal browser or an external browser. If you are using Legacy's internal browser then you will be able to use the icons right above the words LEGACY NEWS. The buttons are Home, Back, Forward, Refresh and Close. You can also allow or block popups. If you are using an external browser you will use the controls on that browser window.

The second section shows your To-Do Tasks that are approaching their Reminder Dates and those that are now overdue (ouch!) You can access these specific tasks as well as your entire To-Do List right from here.

 The third section are your Birthday, Death and Anniversary Reminders. You can see at a glance what important events are coming up. On each person's Individual Information screen and on their Marriage screen there are check boxes for these reminders. You pick and choose who you want to be on this list. You definitely don't want to forget your mom's birthday.

The fourth section is Statistics. This is a quick peek at your file. If you want to see more detailed information all you have to do is to go FILE > FILE PROPERTIES.

Legacy Statistics on Home Tab

The fifth section is Update. You can see at a glance what build you are using and if there is a new update available. If you are using Legacy Deluxe you can update right from here. If you are using Legacy Standard you will need to download the update from our website.http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/DownloadUpdate.asp

The last section is Support. If you have a question or a problem this is the first place you want to go. There are links to all of our training and technical support help. You can also send us suggestions for features you would like to see in future versions of Legacy.

There is an OPTIONS button in the upper right corner. When you click it you will see
Options
Zoom
Check the Internet Now

When you click Options there are two tabs Internet Options and Reminder Options. Under Internet Options most people will have the first option checked but if you have dial-up you will want to select the second option. Reminder Options gives you control over how many days in advanced you want to see To-Do Reminders and Birthday/Death/Anniversary Reminders. The default is 2 weeks. You can also restrict which reminders you see.

Zoom controls your font size for this page. Most of the time you will just leave this on automatic.

Check the Internet Now will refresh the page.

Think of the Legacy Home tab as your Command Center!!

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.


The Top 10 Genealogy Classes of February 2016

We've tallied the numbers and made a list of the Top 10 FamilyTreeWebinars.com classes for February 2016! Are your favorite topics or instructors among the list? Need something new to learn? Use the list to get inspired!

Top10Feb16

Each month thousands of Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers head for the library to learn new skills and techniques to help improve their genealogy research. Among the now-322 genealogy classes in the members-only library, these were the most frequently played during the month of February 2016.  They aren't necessarily the newest classes but rather the topics that were sought out by our members.

Have you seen any of these classes? Are these among your favorites too? Some of these classes (and topics) might be new to you! Get inspired to learn more and make your genealogy journey more fun!

The Top 10 for February 2016

1. 7 Unique Technologies for Genealogy Discoveries at MyHeritage by Mike Mansfield

2. Microsoft Word Series - #1 Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee

3. The Paper-Less Genealogist by Denise May Levenick

4. A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cyndi Ingle

5. The Scots-Irish in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen

6. Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk

7. Microsoft Word Series - #2 Formatting Basics by Thomas MacEntee

8. Solving Genealogy Problems with Timelines by Beth Foulk

9. Locating Pennsylvania Vital and Religious Records by Lisa Alzo

10. Microsoft Word Series - #3 Formatting Tips and Tricks by Thomas MacEntee

The Runner-Ups

11. East, West, and In-Between: Navigating Pennsylvania's Counties and Their Resources by Lisa Alzo

12. Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen

13. Sources and Citations Made Simple, Standard, and Powerful by Geoff Rasmussen

14. Legacy Family Tree and FamilySearch Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen

15. Microsoft Word Series - #4 Solving the Mystery of Styles by Thomas MacEntee

16. Get Organized Using the FamilyRoots Organizer Color-Coding System by Mary Hill

17. Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard

18. What's a Prothonotary? Pennsylvania Court and Legal Records by Lisa Alzo

19. The Basics of Virginia Research by Shannon Combs-Bennett

10. Microsoft Word Series - #5 Understanding Different Types of Breaks by Thomas MacEntee

Access to classes in the Legacy Family Tree Webinar library are available with an annual or monthly membership. Not a member? Become one! Or watch one of our free classes here.


Register for Webinar Wednesday - The War of 1812 Records: Preserving the Pensions by Rebecca Whitman Koford

Register

The War of 1812 records contain more than just the Name, Rank, and Serial Number (minimum information required to give in the event of capture) of the veteran. This webinar will focus on the various documents that might be found in the Pension records of The War of 1812 veterans, how they might be used to overcome brick walls in genealogical research, and about the Preserve The Pensions project (www.preservethepensions.org).

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Join us and Rebecca Whitman Koford for the live webinar Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.  

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Rebecca-Koford-144x144Rebecca Whitman Koford holds a Certified Genealogist® credential.  Her focus is in American research with special emphasis in Maryland. She has been interested in genealogy ever since the age of five, when she could read her parents’ collection of old handwritten family group sheets. Rebecca has been taking clients and lecturing since 2004. She has spoken for the Maryland State Archives and for groups in Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Delaware. She is a board member of the Maryland Genealogical Society and volunteers at the Family History Center in Frederick, Maryland. She has published articles in the NGS Magazine and the Maryland Genealogical Society Journal. She is a graduate of the ProGen Study Group, an online peer-led study program based on the book Professional Genealogy by Elizabeth Shown Mills; she was appointed ProGen Administrator in January 2015. Rebecca is very enthusiastic about the Preserve the Pensions: War of 1812 project sponsored by the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS). Rebecca lives in Mt. Airy, Maryland, with three active teenagers and a very patient husband.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


How to order a large copy of your family tree chart

Pioneers

This was the chart I created of my ancestors who came west via the Oregon Trail. I demonstrated how to make this as part of the after-webinar party the other day. If you missed the step-by-step process of how I created this in Legacy Family Tree, jump ahead to the "After-webinar party" in the Table of Contents in this webinar (Table of Contents is available for webinar subscribers).

Chart

This chart ended up being 24 inches wide by 12 inches tall, and some of you have asked me for a reminder of how to purchase this chart so it is printed on one continuous sheet of paper. Here's the steps:

In Legacy Charting, click on the Order Chart button.

Order

Then, make any adjustments to the sizing of your chart, and then in the Order Options panel, select your paper type, size, and quantity. The exact costs are displayed so there's no guessing. Too expensive? Resize the chart a little bit and you'll be able to see the updated pricing in real time.

Order1

When you're ready, click the Purchase Chart button and fill in the information. The chart file is then sent to our chart printers, Family Chartmasters, for printing, and before you know it, the chart will arrive at your front door.

 


Learn Microsoft Word for free!

The recent Getting Started with Microsoft Word class by Thomas MacEntee has gotten such rave reviews that we've decided to keep it free - indefinitely!

Getting Started with Microsoft Word

Here's what people are saying:

  • "Absolutely fantastic webinar. I've used Word for years on lengthy documents and learned so much today that will help me. His webinar was better than all the books I have on how to work with Word."

  • "Awesome! I knew some of these tips, but Thomas has added so much more. Thank you. My Word editing will go much faster and smoother. :)"

  • "Excellent webinar!! I've been using Word for 30 years and learned new things I didn't even know were possible (or never took the time to investigate), especially the Styles and Format Painter. I look forward to watching the rest of the Word webinars. Thank you for doing these."

  • "I almost didn't sign up for this "Getting Started with Word" I have used Word for years and years. But I hoped for a few tips. OMGoodness. I got way more than I expected. Thomas made it seem so easy. He never talked down to us. He genuinely wants us to learn. He repeated the process (steps) after demonstrating. Great teacher. Great webinar. Thanks Geoff and Thomas"

  • "Thomas never disappoints. He made using Microsoft word look so easy. The examples he provided were easy to follow. He made sure the viewer knew how to do it themselves when they left the webinar. One of the best I have watched. Thank you!"

This first introductory class provides answers to many of the most common yet frustrating challenges for every day Microsoft Word users. And as the reviews above point out, Thomas makes it easy for everyone to learn.

First in a Series

Getting Started in Microsoft Word is the first in the new Microsoft Word Series that was created specifically for FamilyTreeWebinars.com subscribers. The series will teach you everything from Formatting Basics, to Understanding Headers and Footers, to Creating and Using Templates - and much more!

Enjoy the free class on us!

We know you're going to get a lot out of this class! We're convinced that you'll like this class so much that we think you might even want to sign up for a membership

Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 322 classes in the library (465 hours of quality genealogy and technology education)
  • 1,385 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe


Getting Real with Naming Patterns

Genealogists have strong opinions. But are they always correct?

I've been following some online genealogy discussions recently and noticed that we genealogists often answer questions with an emphatic point of view. Very often the answer is an extreme leaning one way or the other, with no middle ground or room for a “perhaps…”

One recent discussion began after a seemingly simple question -- were there naming patterns for children in the 1800s in [fill in blank with any country].

Genealogists began to respond with their opinions. Almost all gave a simple YES or NO. Some provided reasons or rationale or examples to support their YES or NO stance.

But no one jumped in with "Maybe... Sometimes... It depends… Yes, but...."

Getting Real with Naming Patterns


Getting Real


Let's get real! Naming patterns existed. That is correct. Historically parents often named a child in honor of a relative – father, mother, grandfather, grandmother, or other family member.

BUT…Were naming patterns identical in all cultures? No

Did all countries have strict naming pattern conventions? No.

Did naming patterns follow the same rules over the centuries? Were naming patterns in one country during the 16th century identical to naming patterns in the 19th century? No.

Were existing naming patterns used by all families? No.

Our Ancestors Were Just Like Us

It's easy to forget that our ancestors were people like us. They fought, they loved, they cried, they laughed, they had good days, they had bad days, and they made decisions for many of the same reasons we make decisions – including what names to give their children.

Even if there were established naming patterns that were used most of the time, as is the case with the Dutch who settled in the 17th century in what is now New York, as researchers we must keep an open mind as to whether or not the customs were always followed.

Reasons a Couple Might Not Follow Traditional Naming Patterns

Perhaps your ancestor fought with his father or mother and vowed to never name a child in their honor.

Perhaps your ancestor was a free spirit and loved the name Lancelot so broke with tradition even though the first born male in her family had been called James for the last ten generations.

Perhaps your ancestor wanted to cozy up to his rich great uncle so he named his first born son after that person instead of his father.... and gave his second born his father's name.

Perhaps the birth parents had died young and one of the spouses wanted to honor their adoptive parents.

If you find seven children in a family and six are named after known family members such as paternal grandparents, maternal grandparents, aunts, and uncles, then there is a good chance that the seventh was also named after a family member. However it’s important to remember that this is not guaranteed. The couple might have named that child after a good friend, or an important contemporary person, or a benefactor.

Let’s look at a different scenario. In your research you are trying to find the names of the parents of your great-great grandmother. You have a theory as to who her parents are. Then you notice what looks like a naming pattern of her siblings. This pattern fits with the parents you theorized are the correct parents. But one parent's name is missing from the pattern. What to do? That's not the time to toss out your theory! There may be a missing child, one whose existence you aren't aware of, or who died. That child may be the missing link, and may be named after that one parent who is missing from the pattern.

Wiggle Room

Think about this the next time you are tempted to accept an absolute and emphatic yes or no to the question “Do Naming Patterns Exist?” The editor of the New York Biographical and Genealogical Review told me once that absolute answers are never a good idea and that one should always leave oneself some “wiggle room”. In other words don’t back yourself into a corner by giving an absolute answer. There are often exceptions to rules.

So be sure you leave yourself some wiggle room next time you answer a question, and if you are the person asking the question, take absolute answers with a grain of salt.

Use naming patterns as a guide. That's all they are, they are not a set of rules set in stone.

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.

 


Researching Your Georgia Ancestors

A well versed genealogist told me that when you lose an ancestor in south central Virginia in the 1830’s look in Georgia. Losing an ancestor took me from the basement of the Halifax County, Virginia court house to the genealogy records of Georgia.  

Look in Georgia?

The discovery of Georgia gold in 1829 led to the Georgia Gold Rush and an influx of people seeking their fortunes. Almost every surname in Halifax County, Virginia in the 1830’s can be found in Georgia. As it turns out, I was following the ancestor who was following the gold. Without learning the history of the time and the area, looking for my ancestors in Georgia would not have occurred to me. (Tip: Know the historical and economic events that would have impacted your ancestors.)

Now I needed to learn about the Georgia Genealogy resources.

Georgia
Source: Library of Congress


 

Georgia Genealogy Resources

Georgia is made up of 159 counties.  Genealogical records for each county vary as is often found in the Southern states.  Fires, floods and natural disasters account for many of the record losses. Marriage and probate records were recorded by the clerk of the Ordinary Court. Land records were recorded by the Clerk of the Superior Court.  The Superior Court handled most civil cases as well. From 1805-1833, Georgia had a unique land lottery system to distribute lands that had been taken from the Cherokee and Creek Indians.  

Online Resources for Your Georgia Genealogy Research

Georgia Farmer
Georgia Farmer  (Source: Library of Congress)

 

 

African American Genealogy Resources

Are you researching African American ancestors in Georgia?  These resources may be of help.

Genealogical Societies of Georgia

Genealogical societies at the state, regional and local levels provide a variety of helpful resources.

Don't forget to the check out the Legacy QuickGuide: Georgia Genealogy by Stephanie Pitcher Fishman (PDF Edition)

Share your favorite Georgia genealogy resources in the comments below!

[Unfortunately, that gold seeking ancestor did not strike it rich and no family fortune in gold was discovered!]

 

Lisa Lisson is a genealogist, blogger and Etsy-prenuer who writes about her never-ending pursuit of ancestors, the “how” of genealogy research and the importance of sharing genealogy research with our families. Specializing in North Carolina and southern Virginia research, she also provides genealogical research services to clients. In researching her own family history, Lisa discovered a passion for oral history and its role in genealogy research. You can find Lisa online at Lisa Lisson.com.

 

 

 


A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 - free webinar by Cyndi Ingle now online for limited time

2016-02-24-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0" by Cyndi Ingle is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

This begins with a brief history of Cyndi's List, followed by an overview of how to navigate the newly updated site and how to tell when the site is updated. Learn how to effectively use this valuable resource tool as your jumping-off point onto the genealogist's Internet.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 48 minute recording of "A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Mp4Digital Download

This webinar recording is also available as a digital download for just $9.95. It includes the .mp4 and the syllabus for one low price. Click here to purchase. Or, subscribe for a month or a year and also have access to the recording and handouts for the duration of your membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - cyndi - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, February 29, 2016. 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 320 classes, 465 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,375 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Rebecca Koford. March 2.
  • Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard. March 4.
  • How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow. March 9.
  • The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell. March 16.
  • Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. March 23.
  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. March 30.
  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday's Tip - Stripping a Gedcom File for DNA Purposes

  Stripping a Gedcom File for DNA purposes

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Stripping a Gedcom File for DNA Purposes

In last week's Tuesday's Tip we talked about "Keeping Track of DNA Contacts in Legacy." This week we're doing the reverse by discussing the export of Legacy data for DNA purposes.

I needed to upload new gedcom files for 23andMe, FTDNA, Ancestry and GEDMatch today. I needed to do this for myself, my mother and my uncle.

When I upload a gedcom for DNA I strip it of everything except Births, Marriages, and Deaths (BMD). I export the direct line ancestors, siblings of the direct line and the spouses. Setting this up can take some time but there is a nifty little trick. On the EXPORT ITEMS screen there are two handy buttons, SAVE LIST and LOAD LIST. I set up the options exactly like I need for my DNA export and then I click SAVE LIST. I named the settings file "Stripped gedcom for DNA.gl8" You want to give your custom settings a descriptive name in case you save multiple sets of settings. In the screenshot you can see that I have checked all of the boxes excluding all of those items and in the "Export these items" box I have used the "Remove" button to take everything out of there except the BMD info.

Don't forget the Privacy Options button to either exclude living people or change their name to Living.

HINT: You will want the anchor person's name to show up (the person that took the DNA test) but you don't any additional personal information to upload. You can do this two ways. You can kill yourself off (figuratively speaking by entering a death date) and then remove the BMD info from the gedcom or you can let it print LIVING for yourself and simple go into the gedcom and change the name.

This requires you to open the gedcom in Notepad and make the edits there which is a bit of an advanced skill. To make it easier, you can kill yourself off (so that your name will export) and then temporarily put privacy brackets around the BMD info you don't want to be made public.

BMD = Births, Marriages, and Deaths.

Stripping image for DNA Purposes

 

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Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.