Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? Free webinar by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers now online

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The recording of last night's webinar, "Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist?" by ICAPGen's Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

ICAPGenSM is a professional credentialing organization dedicated to testing an individual’s competence in genealogical research. The co-chairs of the ICAPGenSM Testing Committee will discuss the organization, the benefits of achieving an AG®credential, and the accreditation process.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 28 minute recording of "Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist?" is now available to view in our webinar library for free. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Holiday Sale

Through December 31, 2015, take $10 off any new Legacy Family Tree software. Plus discounts on Legacy QuickGuides, add-on software, how-to books and more have been discounted. No coupon required. Only at www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 285 classes, 429 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,260 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. December 18.
  • Tap Into Your Inner Private Eye - 9 Strategies for Finding Living Relatives by Lisa Louise Cooke. January 6.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. January 13.
  • Snagit Software for Genealogists by Michael Brophy. January 15.
  • The Basics of Virginia Research by Shannon Combs-Bennett. January 20.
  • The Paper-Less Genealogist by Denise May Levenick. January 27.
  • The Scots-Irish in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. February 10.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee. February 17.
  • Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk. February 19.
  • A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cyndi Ingle. February 24.
  • The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Michael Hall. March 2.
  • Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard. March 4.
  • How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow. March 9.
  • The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell. March 16.
  • Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. March 23.
  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. March 30.
  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


2016 Legacy Family Tree Webinar Series announced

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Millennia Corporation and FamilyTreeWebinars.com are pleased to announce that registration is now open for its 2016 Legacy Family Tree Webinar Series. Choose from 62 classes from genealogy's leading educators on topics ranging from genealogy technology, to DNA, to in-depth research methodologies.

And not to name-drop, but our series will welcome for the first time genealogy celebrities like Cyndi Ingle of cyndislist.com and John Philip Colletta of genealogyjohn.com, major genealogy organizations like FindMyPast, FamilySearch, MyHeritage, and New England Historic Genealogical Society; and will explore for the first time countries such as Poland and France. Also learn about DNA, software, lineage societies, the Freedmen's Bureau, FANs, "dirty pictures", BillionGraves, Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and so much more.

Sign up (it's FREE!) for one or for all of them today and you will receive a reminder email both one day and one hour prior to the live event.

Register

Webinar Brochure

Print the webinar brochure to share with your friends, genealogy society, or Family History Center.

FamilyTreeWebinars.com memberships

All live webinars (register below) are free and their recordings are free to watch for the first 7 days. With a webinar subscription you also get all of this:

  • Access to 1) all the existing 284 classes in the library (428 hours of quality genealogy education), 2) plus the 61 webinars that will be added during the 2016 season, 3) plus any additional bonus subscribers-only webinars (30 of these so far in 2015) - all available for the duration of your membership
  • Access to all 1,260 pages of instructors' handouts plus the new handouts of the 2016 season
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only BONUS webinars
  • Playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

It's just $49.95/year ($44.95 through 12/31/15).

Subscribe

Nowhere else - on land, at sea, or online - will you find genealogy courses as comprehensive, diverse, or as numerous as you will find at FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

Add it to your Google Calendar

Click here to add the Legacy Family Tree Webinar Series to your Google Calendar.

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2016 Speakers

Lots of brand new speakers join many of your favorites for 2016. One of them may be the one to help you break down your genealogical brick wall! Don't miss even one week!

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2016 Schedule

January 2016

  • Tap Into Your Inner Private Eye - 9 Strategies for Finding Living Relatives by Lisa Louise Cooke. 1/6
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. 1/13
  • Snagit software for Genealogists by Michael Brophy. 1/15
  • The Basics of Virginia Research by Shannon Combs-Bennett. 1/20
  • The Paper-Less Genealogist by Denise Levenick. 1/27
  • MyHeritage - Technologies and Content to Bolster Your Research by MyHeritage. 1/29

February 2016

  • The Scots-Irish in America by Peggy Lauritzen. 2/10
  • Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee. 2/17
  • Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk. 2/19
  • A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cyndi Ingle. 2/24

March 2016

  • The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Michael Hall. 3/2
  • Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard. 3/4
  • How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow. 3/9
  • The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell. 3/16
  • Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. 3/23
  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. 3/30

April 2016

  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. 4/6
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. 4/8
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. 4/13
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. 4/20
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. 4/27

May 2016

  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. 5/4
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. 5/11
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Powell. 5/13
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. 5/18
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. 5/25

June 2016

  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. 6/1
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. 6/8
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. 6/10
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Lauritzen. 6/15
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. 6/22
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. 6/29

Register

July 2016

  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. 7/6
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. 7/13
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. 7/15
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. 7/20
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. 7/27
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. 7/30
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta

August 2016

  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. 8/3
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. 8/10
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. 8/12
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. 8/17
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. 8/24

September 2016

  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. 9/14
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Rich Thomas. 9/16
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. 9/21
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. 9/28

October 2016

  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. 10/5
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. 10/12
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. 10/14
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. 10/19
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. 10/26

November 2016

  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. 11/2
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. 11/9
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. 11/16
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. 11/18
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. 11/30

December 2016

  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. 12/7
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. 12/14
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. 12/16
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. 12/21

Register


How to import Family Tree Maker into Legacy PLUS your questions answered

Yesterday's announcement of the discontinuation of Family Tree Maker has seemed to rock the genealogy world, and thousands have now downloaded Legacy Family Tree as a result. You've also sent in a number of great questions to our Facebook group and support email. Below are some answers to the most commonly-asked questions.

How do I import my FTM file into Legacy?

It's just a 2-step process - export and import. Click here for the free guide or click here to watch the 90 second video. Everything including your names, dates, places, notes, sources, and even your pictures if you're using a newer version of FTM (2012 or later) import into Legacy.

Can I import my Ancestry tree into Legacy?

Yep. At Ancestry.com, go to Trees > Create & Manage Trees > Manage Tree > Export Tree. This will create a GEDCOM file that can then be imported into Legacy using the import steps as listed in the free guide. However, pictures will not be included. The work-around is to use your FTM software to sync with your Ancestry tree, then follow import/export steps.

Do you have video showing an overview of Legacy? I just want to see more of what it can do.

Yes. Here's a few of them.

I prefer to have the full name of the month used for the facts. Is there a way to use the full name of the month instead of the abbreviation?

You bet. In Legacy, go to Options > Customize > Dates and change the Month Format setting to "Full Month Name"

Dates

Can I import my PAF 5 file into Legacy?

Certainly. Here's how:

Paf5

Does Legacy Sync with Ancestry or FamilySearch?

Ancestry - No. We'd love to sync with an Ancestry tree. If you, too, would like this functionality, please write to Ancestry.com and let them know.

FamilySearch - Yes. Here's a class that shows you everything you'd want to know about it.

What is the difference between the standard and deluxe versions?

Millions have download the free, standard edition. Hundreds of thousands are using it - it's that good. The deluxe edition adds more than 100 additional bells and whistles. Click here to compare the two. Legacy's Help File contains the complete list.

Will Legacy work on a Mac?

While it is not specifically designed for the Mac, thousands are using it and loving it on their Mac! Legacy runs on newer Macs that have an Intel chip with Parallels, Virtual Box or Bootcamp installed along with Windows. Crossover doesn't work so well.

Other Questions?

The quickest place to get a question answered is on our Legacy Facebook Group. It's a community of more than 5,000 Legacy users and prospective users, and a great place to ask a question, share a tip, or just lurk.

Of course you can always email us at support@LegacyFamilyTree.com also.

And we've got lots and lots of free videos, tutorials, and entire webinars at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

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Legacy Family Tree offer - upgrade from Family Tree Maker for $10 off through 12/31/15

Earlier Ancestry.com announced in this blog post that they will discontinue their Family Tree Maker software effective December 31, 2015. We know this change is difficult (my very first genealogy software purchase was FTM...), yet know that you will enjoy Legacy Family Tree. Millions have already downloaded it.

image from www.legacyfamilytree.com

How to Import a Family Tree Maker file into Legacy - 90 second video.

 

Also, download the FREE guide here.

Why FTM users love Legacy

So many former FTM users have turned to Legacy, and we asked them why. Here were their top reasons:

  1. Company-user relationship, support
  2. Reasonable pricing and free updates
  3. Navigation and data entry
  4. Sourcing capabilities
  5. User-friendly
  6. Reports
  7. Name list
  8. View multiple databases side-by-side / drag-drop
  9. Web pages

Here's the complete list with the users' comments.

LegacysantaSpecial Legacy Pricing

  1. Free - Standard Edition. Millions have downloaded Legacy. Download here and import your FTM file in minutes.
  2. $10 off - through December 31, 2015, Legacy Deluxe (download-edition) is just $19.95. Click here to purchase.

Need help?

If you ever need a little hand-holding, we are there to help. We are known for our quality and responsive technical support.

Quick Video Overview

 

Need a little research help?

Not only will we help you organize, research, and share your research, we'll show you how to find your ancestors. Visit www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com to learn from industry experts. As of today, 284 classes are available and more are added every month.

* UPDATE *

Lots of you have asked similar questions about media, sources and other data importing. Read this follow-up article where we address many of these questions all in one place.


Deconstructing the Deed

Have you wondered about what you could find regarding your ancestors’ property? Few things were more desired by our forbearers than having their own tract of land. I would also say that in genealogy, few things are more desired than the ability to identify the exact plot of land our ancestors lived on.

Deconstructing the Deed


Let's consider some of the genealogical clues that can be found in a deed. Deeds, mortgages, liens, and patents, all have the potential to add substantial detail to your ancestor’s lives. Six years ago when I set out to research my 5x great-grandfather Elisha Freeman, originally of Mansfield, Connecticut and who later chose to pursue frontier life in the upper Connecticut River, I was stumped, only able to gather incomplete/inconsistent family tree data. But the land records I discovered from his later adopted towns of Hanover, New Hampshire and Norwich, Vermont have kept the research trail hot, establishing details that otherwise exist seemingly nowhere. In April 1777, Elisha of “Norwich, Gloucester County, New York” appeared along with five of his siblings in Rockingham County, New Hampshire where they conveyed their father, Sylvanus Freeman’s property in Hanover, New Hampshire to their brother Sylvanus Freeman Jr. According to the deed, this tract of land was conveyed as a gift for taking care of their widowed mother Mary.1 Beyond just the property description, these records have the ability to unveil rich genealogical detail. All of Elisha’s siblings, their spouses, and residences appear in this document. To this day, I still peruse the stack of deeds I photocopied from the town office in Norwich, Vermont for Elisha Freeman, only to find new leads in my research.

The Anatomy of a Deed

The reward of recreating our ancestor's land does require a skill set and most of all practice. A lot of the times, the density and cursive, complete with colonial English motifs, can intimidate the beginning researcher. Records of this type were for the most part, recorded in a systematic fashion.

Deed to Sylvanus Freeman Jr.
Elisha Freeman, et. al to Silvanus Freeman Jr., Rockingham County, New Hampshire Deeds,
25 Apr 1777, 32:228.

 

  1. The standard heading that introduces the parties, known as the “GRANTOR” and “GRANTEE”. Grantor is the party which is transferring the property out of its possession, while grantee is the party receiving it. A party is comprised of at least one individual (or corporation, town, church or other entity legally permitted to  convey property) being the owner or shared owners of the property. In the case of Elisha Freeman and his siblings, they collectively shared the parcel of land left by their father Sylvanus because no will was filed.
  2. A legal description of the property. The units of measurements vary historically and by the individual’s practice. Typically, you see terms like “rods”, “perches”, “acres”, and others. You do not need to have a surveyor’s background to understand this part of the record; this will be explained further in the article. In some cases, frontier towns were surveyed in a very crude fashion and thus officials described the plot without metes and bound descriptions and only the owner’s name. The tract of land given to younger brother Sylvanus by Elisha and his siblings is identified simply as a plot owned by John Freeman.
  3. Several legal clauses are strung together which give up any interest the GRANTOR has in the land without saying exactly what that interest is. This is known as quitclaiming the land.
  4. Signature of the grantor to the conditions laid out in this document and the officiating judge/clerk has witnessed the complete transaction.
  5. Always make sure to read marginal notes. In this case, it was only the names of the parties. But it can also be an important detail often found in the margins or end of the document is the time which this was entered into the deed book. It may note that the record was copied from an older entry in another deed book. Elisha’s tract of land which he purchased in Norwich, Vermont in 1776 was not recorded in the town’s land records until eleven years later.2 Some records have been copied into the deed books a century or more after their transaction.

Interpreting the Information

When analyzing the land records of your ancestor, you want to set yourself up with an efficient, organized method to intake and evaluate the information. Part of what makes land research so interesting and time-consuming is that it can become a very hands-on project. Studying the surveyor’s descriptions leads us to a physical product, often a visual representation of the property boundaries. Examples would show a sketch of the property’s boundaries and dimensions, an overlay of the property on historic or current maps, and if were lucky, a photograph. I want to acknowledge as many of these approaches so that you can find the right way to establish these connections to your ancestor and their life.

The surveyor’s descriptions, beginning in the middle of the record, usually after the phrase “described and bounded as follows,” are meant to provide directions in which the property’s boundaries are heading. Property markers, often at the meeting point or vertex of two property lines, can be mentioned in various descriptions by the surveyor. You may often see property markers described as “stake and stone” or an arbitrary natural landmark. The direction of the property line is described in relation to the cardinal directions, such as “then south 40 degrees west 46 rods to said Samuel Waterman’s line” or as running parallel to other landmarks such as the river, road, or train tracks. As genealogists, we need to record these features and see if maps can unveil their location.

One tip I can offer when transcribing the deed is to keep a placeholder as you work your way down the page. Most of us will not remember the last coordinate and we waste time trying to find it again amidst the dense penmanship. If you are unfamiliar with transcribing and deciphering old handwriting, pace yourself at first and only focus on one part of the record. In years past, I have transcribed deeds verbatim on a page or word document, but it might be a little easier to digest if you put the property description in an excel document. The table should include the following information:

  1. A number itemizing the surveyor’s description
  2. Degrees
  3. Direction (SE, NW, etc.)
  4. Natural landmark/property description

Because surveyor’s worked using cardinal degrees, land surveys can be reproduced using a protractor and graph paper. This has become a traditional method only recently, because technology and new user-created platting software apps allow anyone to plug in the surveyor’s coordinates and trace the metes and bounds of the property in a much less hands-on fashion. For some of us, like myself, who maybe lack a sense of cardinal direction, technology saves the day in this case. As someone who acknowledges advantages to both methods, you might want to consider a hybrid study of the property in the traditional method and platting technology. Do both renditions of the property match or are their noticeable differences?

The survey description can offer another valuable bit of information on our ancestor: their neighbors. Many land records offer descriptions of the property such as the line running to the NW corner of John Salter’s lot. As a researcher, you want to record these neighbors and start getting to know them. You may want to pull their deeds and start platting their land as well. The outcome of these analyses and study projects can be very useful in visualizing the community of one’s ancestor and presenting proof of kinship.

Essential Resources

FamilySearch – Check FamilySearch’s catalog both online and microfilm for the deeds in your particular area. A sizeable collection of land record research is available for free online, allowing you to peruse original deed books from municipal offices.

FamilySearch Wiki – Need to know where the land records are in a particular state or jurisdiction? The FamilySearch Wiki, maintained by professional and knowledgeable genealogists, will guide you to the right repository.

Bureau of Land Management – Your ancestor may very well have been of the millions of U.S. Citizens to buy land from the federal government. The value of this website is not just in being able to access a digitized image of the original record, but the plat coordinates can be entered in Earthpoint, which will display the exact location and boundaries of the property in Google Earth. Lisa Louise Cooke was very informative in pointing out this tip through her Legacy webinar, “Using Google Earth for Genealogy”.

David Rumsey Historic Map Collection – Historic maps are a great source for genealogists and can be very useful in orienting one’s mind to identify the ancestor’s property. Landmarks and place names often fade out of cultural memory. David Rummey’s collection stands out for it’s availability of free historic maps, as does our Library of Congress.

Genealogytools.net - Free deed platter software! Just plug in the coordinates.

Metes and Bounds - Software for Mac and Windows with free and subscription options available. More options such as overlaying and drawing adjacent properties are featured in this software. 

Recommended Legacy Webinars for Land Research

Chris Staats, "Power Platting - Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions"

Lisa Louise Cooke, “Using Google Earth for Genealogy"

Ron Arons, "Mapping Madness"

 

1. Elisha Freeman, et. al to Silvanus Freeman Jr., Rockingham County, New Hampshire Deeds, 25 Apr 1777, 32:228, recorded 25 Apr 1777: accessed on microfilm at NEHGS.

2. Gershom Bartlett to Elisha Freeman, 5 Mar 1776, Norwich, Vermont land records, 1:27, recorded 14 May 1787: photocopied at Town Clerk’s Office.

3. Ibid.

--------------------------------------

Jake Fletcher is a genealogist and blogger. He received his Bachelor Degree for History in 2013 and is now researching genealogy professionally. Jake has been researching and writing about genealogy since 2008 on his research blog Travelogues of a Genealogist. He currently volunteers as a research assistant at the National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts.

 

 

 


New Legacy QuickGuide Now Available - North Dakota Genealogy by Deena Coutant

Legacy QuickGuidesTM have quickly become one of the more popular resources for genealogists. Each guide contains four (sometimes five, sometimes more) pages of valuable information covering a variety of genealogy research topics, dozens of clickable links, and are written by genealogists and family historians who are experts in the subject areas. We've added another brand new Legacy QuickGuide: North Dakota Genealogy by Deena Coutant. Now choose from 88 Legacy QuickGuides!

North Dakota GenealogyNorth Dakota Genealogy by Deena Coutant - $2.95

North Dakota, although achieving statehood relatively late, has a rich history. Inhabited by Native Americans before the European fur trappers arrived, it was part of several U.S. territories before joining the Union. Its fertile soils attracted hundreds of thousands of immigrants that helped to shape its culture and history and lived through its booms and busts. Even though its population is relatively small, there are numerous records available to help research those who called the Peace Garden State home.

The North Dakota Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains valuable research strategy to help you find your Peace Garden State ancestors. This handy 13-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

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Now choose from 88!

Purchase for just $2.95

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Register for Webinar Wednesday - Thinking About Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers

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ICAPGenSM is a professional credentialing organization dedicated to testing an individual’s competence in genealogical research. The co-chairs of the ICAPGen Testing Committee will discuss the organization, the benefits of achieving an AG®credential, and the accreditation process.

Join us and Accredited Genealogists, Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers, for the live webinar Wednesday, December 9, 2015 at 9pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

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About the presenters

CoxsummersApryl Cox, AG® is a professional researcher, instructor, and lecturer. She is an APG member and a former ICAPGen commissioner. Apryl is an adjunct professor at Brigham Young University where she teaches family history courses. She conducts client research and consultation, and lectures at national, state, and local conferences.

Kelly Summers is an Accredited Genealogist®. She received her B.A. in Family and Community History from Brigham Young University. She received her M.S. degree in Instructional Design and Educational Technology from the University of Utah. Her research expertise is in U.S. Midwestern & US Pacific and Spain. Kelly is experienced in Spanish, Latin American & Scandinavian research. Kelly teaches and lectures on many genealogical topics including methodology and specific record types found in U.S. and Spanish research. She teaches part-time at BYU, classes include Beginning Family History & Genealogy and Beginning Scandinavian Research, Beginning French & Italian Research, Beginning Spanish Research. Kelly also designs and teaches online genealogy classes at Salt Lake Community College. Kelly serves as the Testing Committee Co-Chair for the International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists (ICAPGen).

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Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, December 9, 2015 at:

  • 9pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 8pm Central
  • 7pm Mountain
  • 6pm Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


The Top 10 Genealogy Classes for November 2015

We've tallied the numbers and made a list of the Top 10 Legacy Family Tree Webinar classes for November 2015! Are your favorite topics or instructors among the list?  Need something new to learn? Use the list to get inspired!

The Top 10 Legacy Classes for November 2015


Each month thousands of Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers head for the library to learn new skills and techniques to help improve their genealogy research. Among the now-283 genealogy classes in the library, these were the most frequently played during the month of November 2015.  They aren't necessarily the newest classes but rather the topics that were sought out by our members.

Have you seen any of these classes? Are these among your favorites too? Some of these classes (and topics) might be new to you! Get inspired to learn more and make your genealogy journey more fun!

The Top 10 for November 2015

  1. Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner

  2. Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard

  3. Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk

  4. Researching with Karen 3! by Karen Clifford

  5. Grand Records of the Grand Army of the Republic (BONUS webinar for subscribers) by Ruby Coleman

  6. Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 1 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen

  7. Spreadsheets 201 - Excel-lent Examples (BONUS webinar for subscribers) by Mary Kircher Roddy

  8. Using Evernote for Genealogy by Lisa Louise Cooke

  9. I Had My DNA Tested - Now What? by Ugo Perego

  10. Get Organized Using the FamilyRoots Organizer Color-Coding System by Mary Hill

The classes in the Legacy Family Tree Webinar library are a members-only benefit. Not a member? Become one! Or watch the recording of the latest live class which is always available for free for a limited time!

 

 

 


Crafting History: Bring Your Ancestors to Life - new webinar by Mary Roddy now available

New BONUS Webinar in the Legacy Library!

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Ideas for honoring your ancestor

Sharing your family history can mean more than just writing a book. Sprinkle your ancestors into your daily life! Learn how to:

  • create jewelry
  • holiday ornaments
  • and decorative items

using ancestral photos and stories. When your friends and relatives see your ancestors they will want to know them, too.

Crafting History - Bring Your Ancestors to Life - Members Login to Watch Now! 

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Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 283 classes in the library (424 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 1,249 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars
  • Playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Click here to subscribe.

Free Webinars

Our public live webinars are all free. Click here to see what's on the schedule.


10 Easy Steps to Organizing Family Photos (part 2)

If you haven't already, please read 10 Easy Steps to Organizing Family Photos (part 1)

  10 East Steps to Organizing Family Photos part 2


And now on to the last 5 steps of your organizational project!

Step 6: Time To Do Your Second Sort

Now we will work on one box at a time so choose one (don’t cheat – choose only one!) you want to start with. This is a good time to put the other boxes away out of sight until you are ready for them. A large project will seem less intimidating and overwhelming if you break it into smaller chunks.

For this step you choose one box and re-sort it into more focused or precise categories. So for example I took the box I had categorized in my first sort as Mom and her family. I then sorted those photos into 3 more specific categories:

  1. mother from a baby to marriage
  2. mother’s father and his siblings and ancestors
  3. mother’s mother and her siblings and ancestors

A question might arise at this point – what to do if some of the photos have, for example in the photo below, my mother is a child with her sister, her mother and father (my grandparents) and several of her aunts and uncles). I must make a choice as to which person in the photo is my main focus or the closest generation to me. In this case I chose my mother because she is the closest to me generationally. That photo went into category Mother from baby to marriage. It’s a personal choice and up to each individual to decide on what works for them.

 

Photo in collection of Lorine McGinnis Schulze taken ca 1920 Guelph Ontario Canada
Photo in collection of Lorine McGinnis Schulze taken c. 1920 Guelph Ontario Canada

 Another question that may arise during this step is what to do with photographs of houses, pets, cars - in other words photos without people in them. You can assign them to the person or family who owned the object in the time period you think the photo was taken. You may also have such photos where you do not know who owned them. It is important then to note where the photo came from – who gave it to you or whose house it was found in? You may end up with one box of unidentified photos such as this but keep them as you may eventually find out the story behind them. This can also be the case with photos of people who you don’t know.

The photo below shows the gold watch given to my grandfather on his 21st birthday. It will go in the box the photos of his life from baby to marriage.

 

Photo by Lorine McGinnis Schulze of Charles Fuller's Gold Pocket Watch
Photo by Lorine McGinnis Schulze of Charles Fuller's Gold Pocket Watch

 

You might also want to decide at this point what you are going to do with duplicates. Are you keeping them? Are you giving duplicates to family members? I kept large padded envelopes at hand and every time I spotted a duplicate photo I made a quick decision as to who it should go to. Then I put it in an envelope labelled with that person’s name. Any duplicates going to my children went into a box for each of them. That worked well for me and I can decide if I want to give them their box of photos now or wait for a future date

Step 7: Third Sort

Each sort becomes more and more refined. The number of times you will need to sort depends on how many photos you have and how you are categorizing them. For example, I have very few photos of my father and his family before he was married. So I will be able to skip Step 7 and move on to Step 8 which is the final sort. For my mother’s family I have hundreds of photos on both her mother’s and father’s side so I am going to have to do Step 7.

For example in Step 6 I created one pile of photos for my mother’s mother (my maternal grandmother) and her family. As it happens I have close to 100 photos of my grandmother, her parents, her great-grandparents on both sides, and so on. So I am going to have to do a more specific sort by families, surnames or years.

Step 8: Final Sort

Step 8 is to take one of the piles you have from Step 7 and arrange the photos in some kind of order. I chose to arrange them by chronological order, so for the pile of photos of my mother from a baby to marriage I arranged them by years or by estimates of years. You might arrange them by surname or by individual. The choice is yours.

Chart by Lorine McGinnis Schulze
Chart by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

 

 Step 9: Labelling Your Photos

I suggest you add information such as name(s) of those in the photo, a location and a year on the back of each photo. Be careful to write lightly and along an edge so that your writing will not damage the photo if it presses in too far. I don’t advise using pen or marker but a Standard #2 graphite pencil should be fine. You can purchase archival pencils but they are expensive and they may not be in your budget.

Archivists will no doubt disagree with me. In a perfect world we would not take a chance on altering or possibly damaging a photograph with a notation but the reality is that photos fall out of binders. They get dumped out of storage boxes. When they are passed from generation to generation eventually (and very quickly!) there will be no one who knows who is in the photo unless they are labelled.

How often have we seen photos for sale in antique stores or at flea markets and no one knows who the person is. They are lost forever and that is heart-breaking. So I have made a personal decision to do the best I can to safely preserve my treasured photographs while making sure they are not only accessible but notated for others.

Step 10: Done!

When you finish one pile of photos from one box, you can put them away in your pre-chosen binders or storage boxes. Then you start all over again – keep sorting and organizing one box and one pile at a time until they are all done.

Once all your photos are neatly organized and labelled in their boxes or binders you can sit back, relax and think about what a great job you just accomplished! Then it’s time to think about scanning and sharing them. I will talk about digital organization of photos in a separate blog post.

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.