Putting a Face on Your Ancestors

by Marian Pierre-Louis

LarenedTree-Charlotte

How do you react to the shadow people? That's what I call the pink and blue profile silhouettes in most family history software programs. They are place holders for real photos but when you don't have photos of your ancestors they just become shadow people.

Personally, I ignore the shadow people. I don't even see them anymore. I don't want to get my hopes up so I just pretend they don't exist. Until recently.

I have been working hard on finding my great great grandmother, Charlotte Hill who died at age 33 in 1862. Discovering the location of her gravestone was a great thrill. This is likely the closest I'll come to a physical connection with her. There may be a extant photograph of her somewhere but whether her name was written on the back or whether a descendant has the photo are two things I'll likely never know.

Since I spent so much time researching Charlotte I inevitably spent quite a bit of time researching her husband, William Chandler Learned, who lived a long life, and her two children. In addition I also researched William's second and third wives and the children produced from those marriages.

My great-grandmother, Clara (Charlotte's daughter), was only 9 years old when William married his third wife, Adda Setchel, in 1868. Adda lived to the ripe old age 86. She was part of Clara's life for 60 years before her death and it's probably safe to say that she was the only mother Clara ever knew.

At first, I hadn't really considered researching the other wives but I'm glad I changed my mind because it changed everything for me.

While researching the entire family I discovered that Adda and her daughter, Abbie liked to travel. I came across ship passenger lists from their trips to Europe. The real gold came when I found them in the US Passport Applications, 1795-1925 database on Ancestry.com. The early passports, from 1914 and earlier, may contain descriptions of our ancestors. You'll find information about age, stature, eye color, hair color, complexion and the shape of their forehead, nose, mouth, chin and face. What a wonderful surprise to find details about how an ancestor looked!

If you are lucky enough to have ancestors who traveled abroad between 1915 and 1925 you will be rewarded with an actual photograph of your ancestor! From this database I discovered photos of Adda Setchel and her daughter Abbie Learned.

I already had some photos of my great-grandmother, Clara. Since she and Abbie were half sisters it was fun to compare their features. I tried to imagine which traits Clara and Abbie both inherited from their paternal Learned side and which they got from their respective mothers. Abbie had a brother, William Setchel Learned, and I had a photo of him as well. Quite a handsome chap!

Now with photos of 3 out of 5 siblings and one mother I was ready to start replacing the shadow people in my family tree!

What a treat it is to look at a pedigree chart and see actual faces instead of silhouettes! This transformation has encouraged me to seek out more images of my ancestors. It may be difficult but I will work hard to find more photos.

You can try the Passport Applications database to find photos of your ancestors. Be aware, however, that not everyone's ancestors will be included. Your ancestors needed to be wealthy enough to travel abroad and to pay for the passport application fee. But don't discount your ancestors, took a look anyway. Your ancestors may just yet surprise you!

If you have another unusual public source for ancestor photos please be sure to let us all know. It would be wonderful to convert as many silhouettes as possible to actual faces.

 

LearnedTree

Marian Pierre-Louis is the Social Media Marketing Manager for Legacy Family Tree. She is also the host of The Genealogy Professional podcast. Check out her webinars in the Legacy library.


Lose weight and learn Legacy

How's that for a blog post's title?

I just received an email from a Legacy user who has been reading my book, Legacy Family Tree Unlocked. I got such a kick out of her last paragraph that I had to share it with all of you here.

...Oh, by the way I am reading Unlocked at the gym while on an exercise bike. I am on page 98 and have lost 4 pounds - I guess I believe in multi-tasking -- gaining knowledge while loosing weight! LOL

I've heard of people reading Unlocked in their bed, at their computer, and now for the first time, at the gym on an exercise bike.

Where do you like to read?

Oh, and if you're wondering where you can get a copy of Legacy Unlocked!, click the picture:

Unlocked


Germans from Russia - brand new BONUS webinar for subscribers

Germansrussia

Struggling with finding your German ancestors? Maybe they were part of the large group who left their native land to settle in their own ethnic and religious groups. Join Gail Shaffer Blankenau, presenter of the popular "Women Homesteaders and Genealogy" webinar, as she teaches us how to find our Germans from Russia.

Webinar's Description

In 1762, Empress Catherine of Russia invited ethnic Germans to immigrate to Russia to develop the country's agriculture, allowing them to retain their language and culture. Thousands of Germans left their native land to settle in their own ethnic and religious groups. In the late 18th century some of Catherine's preferential terms began to be revoked, prompting another large migration--this time to the New World. We will discuss issues facing genealogists who have ancestors who were Germans from Russia as well as explore sources and methods.

How to view:

If you are an annual or monthly webinar subscriber, this webinar's recording is now available in the Webinar Library. Just head over to the library, login, and enjoy! 7 pages of supplemental syllabus materials also accompany this webinar.

Click here to watch the webinar.

If you are not yet a webinar subscriber...when you join as an annual or monthly subscriber you, too, will have access to these bonus members-only webinars. This is the seventh we've added since January. Take a look at all of these benefits:

  • Unlimited access to the entire Webinar Library (currently 222 classes to choose from)
  • Access to the instructors' handouts (currently 924 pages)
  • Access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • 5% off anything in the FamilyTreeWebinars.com store
  • See which live webinars you have registered for

For more information, or to subscribe, click here.

About the presenter

Presenter-7776Gail Blankenau is an experienced genealogist, speaker and author. Her publications include articles in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register and The Genealogist. She is also a contributor to Family Chronicle and Internet Genealogy magazines. Based in Nebraska, she specializes in Nebraska records, Midwestern roots, German genealogy, land records, 19th-Century photographs and tracing lineages. More than half her ancestors came from New England, but she has roots in almost every state east of the Mississippi.

Click here for all of Gail's webinars.


Genealogy 101, Part 1: Getting Started on the Right Foot - free webinar by Peggy Lauritzen now online for limited time

Webinarlogo

The recording of today's webinar, "Genealogy 101, Part 1: Getting Started on the Right Foot" by Peggy Lauritzen is now available in the Webinar Library for free for a limited time. A few comments:

  • Am an advanced researcher and I very much enjoyed listening to Peggy today! She had many suggestions for all of us and very smooth presentation. Looking forward to hearing her again!

  • Excellent! I could listen to her every day! I loved her filing system.

  • Fun AND informative. I signed up thinking it would be an overview for me, but I learned so many things I can do to make my research more fruitful, interesting, and ENJOYABLE that I'd never even thought of. Looking forward to part 2!

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 48 minute recording of "Genealogy 101, Part 1: Getting Started on the Right Foot" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - beginner1 - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, April 6, 2015.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 222 classes, 325 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 924 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (that's about the cost of 5 webinar CDs)
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • American Revolution Genealogy by Beth Foulk. April 8.
  • Hookers, Crooks, and Kooks - Aunt Merle Didn't Run a Boarding House by Jana Sloan Broglin. April 10.
  • Ten Genealogical Lessons I Learned the Hard Way by Warren Bittner. April 15.
  • D-I-V-O-R-C-E! by Judy Russell. April 22.
  • United States Colored Troops Civil War Widows' Pension Applications: Tell the Story by Bernice Alexander Bennett. April 24.
  • Using Legacy with Specialized Studies - Legacy is for more than your family history by Tessa Keough. April 29.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 2 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. May 6.
  • After You're Gone - Future-Proofing Your Genealogy Research by Thomas MacEntee (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). May 8.
  • GenealogyBank - The Power of Finding Our Ancestor's Stories by Tom Kemp. May 13.
  • Martha Benshura - Enemy Alien by Judy Russell. May 20.
  • Migration Patterns East of the Mississippi Prior to 1860 by Mary Hill. May 27.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 3 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 3.
  • Tips for Planning a Successful Seminar by Jana Sloan Broglin. June 10.
  • 10 Tips for Using Legacy with Specialized Studies by Tessa Keough. June 12.
  • The Secret Lives of Women - Researching Female Ancestors Using the Sources They Left Behind by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 1.
  • Pinning Your Family History by Thomas MacEntee. July 8.
  • Making a Federal Case Out of It by Judy Russell (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). July 10.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. July 15.
  • Have Swedish Roots and Don't Know How to Get Started? by Kathy Meade. July 22.
  • Storyboard Your Family History by Lisa Alzo. July 29.
  • Mending Broken Ties: Reconstructing Family Trees Sawed by Slavery by Melvin J. Collier. July 31.
  • What's in a Name? Trouble! by Ron Arons. August 5.
  • Power Platting - Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions by Chris Staats. August 12.
  • Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors by Mark Lowe. August 19.
  • Digital Family Reunions by Devin Ashby. August 21.
  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


A genealogy miracle - finding ancestors with Mom

by Geoff Rasmussen

Geoffmom

I never thought this day would come. After what my mother just told me, my genealogy career just became completely worth it.

Mom has always supported me even when she wasn't that interested in what I was doing. She watched my sporting events, helped me through scouting, and patiently taught me the piano. She loved me even when she probably shouldn't have. She has even shown her love by sitting through one or two of my in-person genealogy classes. I think she has always been happy to let others (like myself, her mother and sisters) work on her genealogy.

Last week she surprised me by asking for help with navigating the FamilySearch.org site. I initially thought she was just being her loving self again and showing interest because it was something I enjoy. We searched census records, vital records, and even explored FindAGrave.com together. I was having the time of my life. AND we had genealogy success. We found and documented a new family together. We concluded, had dinner, and visited with my grandparents. A good day.

Fast forward two days when we got together for my 13-year-old son's birthday party. We while casually talked, she told me something I never thought would leave her lips. She mentioned that she found an ancestor, on her own, on purpose, without my help or coercion. She applied what I tried to teach her and she had success! If I were done recovering from this recent back surgery I would have got up and enjoyed a genealogy happy dance, and so I enjoyed it from the couch. My mother found an ancestor. Wow.

I don't know that my mother will continue this pursuit, but I sure enjoyed the time with her. I've even got a nice picture of the memory. And isn't that one of the good things in life - making memories with family.


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Genealogy 101: Getting Started on the Right Foot by Peggy Lauritzen

Logowhite

We all have an aunt or a grandmother that has a shoebox full of obituaries, funeral cards, or other old documents that sit on a dresser or closet shelf. Or, perhaps we are that person with the shoebox. These beginning genealogy sessions will show how to take what you know and what you have access to, and teach the steps involved in getting it organized and compiled into a useful genealogy that can benefit future generations.

Session 1 - Getting Started on the Right Foot. All of us know at least a bit of information about our family. It may be something we have heard, or something we have and don't know how it can help us. We will start out learning about information from an obituary, and entering the facts into the Legacy Family Tree software.

Join us for the live webinar Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Lauritzenp-100Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG, was involved in genealogy before she was even born. The daughter of avid genealogists, she was spending time in courthouses and cemeteries while other children were playing on swings and going to the beach. The love of her family’s history has never left her. With her experience as a former Family History Director, she is a frequent speaker at genealogical societies, workshops, seminars, and webinars where she loves bringing genealogy to life. Some of those would include The Ohio Genealogical Society, The Ohio State University, Brigham Young University, and many other state and local genealogy societies. She has recently completed several Legacy QuickGuides on Appalachia, which are also available on www.legacyfamilytree.com and www.amazon.com.

View Peggy's other webinars here.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Let the "New" Guide You to the "Old"

by Marian Pierre-Louis

NewWoodstockNY-cc-TaylorStanley

Graveyard in New Woodstock, New York

Recently I've started researching a new family line. Perhaps a better description would long ignored family line. There are so many lines in a family tree that it is very hard to get to them all.

A month or so ago I broke through a brick wall related to my great great grandmother, Charlotte Hill. Only after feeling confident about my findings did I start to work on Charlotte's parents. Remember, we need to work from the known to the unknown.

So I found myself, for the very first time, researching Semira Frizzell, my Charlotte's mother. I've always thought Frizzell was a funny sounding name and with the addition of a first name like Semira it was almost too much for me to take seriously.  It turns out (according to the Annals of the (Frizzell) Frazier Family (1890) by Walter S. Frazier) that Frizzell comes from the Scottish name Fraser.

Through probate and cemetery records I was able to figure out at Semira was born in Cazenovia, Madison County, New York the daughter of Samuel Frizzell and Polly Tiffany.

New York state in the early 1800s is hard to research at best. I started without much of anything. But what I did notice was that many of references surrounding this family mentioned "New Woodstock,"  New York.

I knew that Cazenovia was the true formal location of the family. I also knew that New York has many villages. I guessed that was likely the case with New Woodstock.

To resolve the open question I went to a site I use frequently, the National Association of Counties (NACO). Normally I use this site to look up the counties of the towns I research in. I know from past experience that this site also has the added benefit of describing the legal designation of a place (town, city, village, etc). Interestingly enough (but perhaps not surprisingly), the Type of Place field for New Woodstock came up empty on the NACO site. My suspicion that this was a very small place was reinforced.

My next stop to resolve the issue was Wikipedia. The Wikipedia entry for New Woodstock, New York was very short - only two sentences - but it gave me the information I needed. "New Woodstock is a hamlet in the town of Cazenovia, Madison County, New York." Further delving into Wikipedia reveals that a hamlet is a small, rural, unincorporated place.

Why so much fuss about whether New Woodstock is a hamlet, village, town or city? Hamlets can be either outdated place names, once larger places that have dwindled through population loss or they can be names bestowed by the people who settled in a particular area (this is my opinion not a hard core rule).

As a New England girl who grew up in Connecticut I couldn't help but wonder if New Woodstock wasn't really a sentimental reference to a place of origin. While many of you might automatically think of Woodstock, New York, the scene of the famous 1969 music festival, I had Woodstock, Connecticut in my mind. Many New Englanders are well-known to have travelled westward to settle in New York.

With a paucity of New York records, I thought it couldn't hurt to take a quick peek at Frizzles in Woodstock, Connecticut. A search on Ancestry.com (Early Connecticut Marriages Database) uncovered a marriage for Samuel Frizzell of (sic) Cazonosia, NY and Polly Tiffany of Ashford, Connecticut on 18 January 1798. While it wasn't Woodstock, Ashford was very close by, also in Windham County Connecticut.

Further research revealed several generations of Frizzells in Woodstock in the book The History of Woodstock, Connecticut: Genealogies of Woodstock Families Vol. 5 (1933) by Clarence Winthrop Bowen.

So my gut reaction was right. New Woodstock was a name bestowed by settlers that harkened back to their family place of origin. By following my instincts I was able to make the connection much easier than if I continued to search in New York for direct evidence. I still have a lot of work  to do ahead of me to verify and prove this family line but I'm so glad my instincts made the discovery process a little quicker.

The next time you come across a town with "New" at the front check the NACO site for it will give you a list of all the places in the United States that have a town or city by that name. Just be sure to drop the "New" when you search.

Let me know how you make out. I would love to hear if anyone else has had success using this technique.

 

Marian Pierre-Louis is the Social Media Marketing Manager for Legacy Family Tree. She is also the host of The Genealogy Professional podcast. Check out her webinars in the Legacy library.

 

 

Photo credit: Creative Commons, Ariana Rose Taylor-Stanley


New book - How to Archive Family Keepsakes by Denise Levenick

KeepsakeOn the heels of the announcement of one of my favorite webinars ever, I'm happy to announce that we are now carrying Denise May Levenick's book, "How to Archive Family Keepsakes." Check it out below.

24.95 18.95

Buybutton-144

In every family someone ends up with Mom's and Dad's "stuff"—a lifetime's worth of old family photos, papers, and memorabilia packed into boxes, trunks, and suitcases. This inheritance can be as much a burden as it is a blessing. How do you organize your loved one's estate in a way that honors your loved one, keeps the peace in your family and doesn't take over your home or life? How to Archive Family Keepsakes gives you step-by-step advice for how to organize, distribute and preserve family heirlooms.

You'll learn how to:

  • Organize the boxes of your parents' stuff that you inherited
  • Decide which family heirlooms to keep
  • Donate items to museums, societies, and charities
  • Protect and pass on keepsakes
  • Create a catalog of family heirlooms
  • Organize genealogy files and paperwork
  • Digitize family history records
  • Organize computer files to improve your research

Whether you have boxes filled with treasures or are helping a parent or relative downsize to a smaller home, this book will help you organize your family archive and preserve your family history for future generations.

Paperback: 208 pages, 6" x 9"

24.95 18.95

Buybutton-144


Where Does It Say That? Learning to Love Indirect Evidence - free webinar by Chris Staats now online for limited time

Webinarlogo

The recording of today's webinar, "Where Does It Say That? Learning to Love Indirect Evidence" by Chris Staats is now available in the Webinar Library for free for a limited time. Check out these comments:

  • Best seminar I have seen. I gained much from watching a professional genealogist work through a series of non-trivial
    problems.

  • This pulled together so much of the info gleaned from various seminars on
    sources and analysis. It really got my mind working. I thought it would be sort of an overview to strengthen my research skills, but it went way beyond that. I will be going back to my research with an enriched sense of how to approach it.

  • This is hands down the best presentation I have heard from Legacy.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 32 minute recording of "Where Does It Say That? Learning to Love Indirect Evidence" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - evidence4 - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, March 30, 2015.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 220 classes, 324 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 919 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (that's about the cost of 5 webinar CDs)
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 1 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. April 1.
  • American Revolution Genealogy by Beth Foulk. April 8.
  • Hookers, Crooks, and Kooks - Aunt Merle Didn't Run a Boarding House by Jana Sloan Broglin. April 10.
  • Ten Genealogical Lessons I Learned the Hard Way by Warren Bittner. April 15.
  • D-I-V-O-R-C-E! by Judy Russell. April 22.
  • United States Colored Troops Civil War Widows' Pension Applications: Tell the Story by Bernice Alexander Bennett. April 24.
  • Using Legacy with Specialized Studies - Legacy is for more than your family history by Tessa Keough. April 29.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 2 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. May 6.
  • After You're Gone - Future-Proofing Your Genealogy Research by Thomas MacEntee (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). May 8.
  • GenealogyBank - The Power of Finding Our Ancestor's Stories by Tom Kemp. May 13.
  • Martha Benshura - Enemy Alien by Judy Russell. May 20.
  • Migration Patterns East of the Mississippi Prior to 1860 by Mary Hill. May 27.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 3 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 3.
  • Tips for Planning a Successful Seminar by Jana Sloan Broglin. June 10.
  • 10 Tips for Using Legacy with Specialized Studies by Tessa Keough. June 12.
  • The Secret Lives of Women - Researching Female Ancestors Using the Sources They Left Behind by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 1.
  • Pinning Your Family History by Thomas MacEntee. July 8.
  • Making a Federal Case Out of It by Judy Russell (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). July 10.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. July 15.
  • Have Swedish Roots and Don't Know How to Get Started? by Kathy Meade. July 22.
  • Storyboard Your Family History by Lisa Alzo. July 29.
  • Mending Broken Ties: Reconstructing Family Trees Sawed by Slavery by Melvin J. Collier. July 31.
  • What's in a Name? Trouble! by Ron Arons. August 5.
  • Power Platting - Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions by Chris Staats. August 12.
  • Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors by Mark Lowe. August 19.
  • Digital Family Reunions by Devin Ashby. August 21.
  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


New Legacy QuickTip Video - How to 'unlink' a child, parent, or spouse if needed

We have another great Legacy QuickTip Video for you today! Learn:

  • How to use unlink a child, parent, or spouse.

Sometimes we accidentally add a child to the incorrect set of parents, or we disprove a certain relationship. We do not want to delete the person, but rather link them to the correct relationship. This quicktip video will show you how.

Click here for the video.

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Click here for more Legacy QuickTip videos.