Dutch Genealogy - new Legacy QuickGuide by John Boeren now available

Legacy QuickGuidesTM have quickly become one of the more popular resources for genealogists. Each guide contains four (sometimes five, sometimes more) pages of valuable information covering a variety of genealogy research topics, dozens of clickable links, and are written by genealogists and family historians who are experts in the subject areas. We've added another new Legacy QuickGuide: Dutch Genealogy by John Boeren. Now choose from 85 Legacy QuickGuides!

Dutch GenealogyDutch Genealogy - 2.95  

The Dutch Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains valuable research strategy to help you find your Dutch ancestors. This handy 8-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 
Many have ancestors of Dutch origin; some of them arrived as early settlers in the 17th century, others as immigrants in the 19th and 20th century. Dutch research requires knowledge of the Dutch language, which makes it a challenge for researchers from other countries. The good thing is that Dutch archives are full with documents that survived wars and other calamities. Many archives and collections go back in time more than 400 years. And if you are lucky, you will find traces of your ancestors back to the 13th or 14th century. An ever-growing digital collection of genealogical records makes online research quite easy. 
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Now choose from 85!

Purchase for just $2.95

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Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips - free webinar by Cari Taplin, CG now available for limited time

2017-03-10-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips" by Cari Taplin, CG is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

This class will cover the main research strategies for finding your Kansas ancestors, including important historical events that influenced settlers, immigration and migration trends, and major record groups and repositories.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 32 minute recording of "Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

Kansas GenealogyLegacy QuickGuide: Kansas Genealogy 2.95

Looking to find those elusive ancestors in the Sunflower State? The Kansas Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including a timeline of Kansas history events, tips on Kansas research strategy, outline of major immigrant groups, and more. Also included are links to websites and resources covering vital records, church records, census records, as well as general Kansas resources. This handy 6-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

Click here to purchase for 2.95.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 479 classes, 665 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,203 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. March 15.
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Friday - Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips by Cari Taplin, CG

Register

This class will cover the main research strategies for finding your Kansas ancestors, including important historical events that influenced settlers, immigration and migration trends, and major record groups and repositories.

Join us and Cari Taplin, CG for the live webinar Friday, March 10, 2017 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

CariTaplin-144x144Cari Taplin is related to Roy Rogers. Or at least that’s what her family told her. As a result, she has been working on finding her true heritage since the year 2000. She is a native of Wood County, Ohio but migrated to Wyoming, Colorado and now Pflugerville, Texas which is just outside Austin. Cari holds the Certified Genealogist® credential and has served in a wide variety of volunteer and leadership positions for several state, local, and national societies and currently serves as the Education Chair for the Austin Genealogical Society, and on the boards of the Association for Professional Genealogists and the Federation of Genealogical Societies. As the owner of GenealogyPANTS, she provides speaking, research and consultation services. Cari focuses on midwestern states, methodology and researching family legends.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Friday, March 10, 2017 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know - free webinar by Gena Philibert-Ortega now online for limited time

2017-03-08-image500blog

The recording of Wednesday's webinar, "50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know" by Gena Philibert-Ortega is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

You’re familiar with Ancestry.com and FamilySearch but there's so much more to researching genealogy then the well-known websites. Learn more about other websites that can help you with your genealogy and help you break down brick walls.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 32 minute recording of "50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 478 classes, 663 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,203 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips by Cari Taplin, CG. March 10.
  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. March 15.
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Wednesday: 50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know by Gena Philibert-Ortega

Register

You’re familiar with Ancestry.com and FamilySearch but there's so much more to researching genealogy then the well-known websites. Learn more about other websites that can help you with your genealogy and help you break down brick walls.

Join us and Gena Philibert-Ortega for the live webinar Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at 8pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

GenaOrtega-144x144Gena Philibert-Ortega holds a Master's degree in Interdisciplinary Studies (Psychology and Women's Studies) and a Master's degree in Religion. Presenting on various subjects involving genealogy, women's studies, and social history, Gena has spoken to groups throughout the United States as well as virtually to audiences worldwide. Gena is the author of hundreds of articles published in genealogy newsletters and magazines including FGS Forum, APG Quarterly, Internet Genealogy, Family Chronicle, Family Tree Magazine, GenWeekly and the WorldVitalRecords newsletter. Her writings can also be found on her blogs, Gena's Genealogy and Food.Family.Ephemera. She is the author of the books, From The Family Kitchen (F + WMedia, 2012), Cemeteries of the Eastern Sierra (Arcadia Publishing, 2007) and Putting the Pieces Together. Gena is the editor of the Utah Genealogical Association's journal Crossroads. An instructor for the National Institute for Genealogical Studies, Gena has written courses about social media and Google. She serves as a board member of the Utah Genealogical Association. Her current research interests include women's social history, community cookbooks, signature quilts and researching women's lives using material artifacts. Gena Philibert-Ortega is the author of IDG's monthly column, Remember the Ladies: Researching Your Female Ancestor. 

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at:

  • 8pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 7pm Central
  • 6pm Mountain
  • 5pm Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Legacy Genealogy Cruise 2017 to feature Thomas MacEntee

201606 tmacenteeThe 2017 Legacy Genealogy Cruise - an annual event in its 14th year - is pleased to announce that professional genealogist and technology educator Thomas MacEntee (and popular webinar speaker) will be joining the event as its featured speaker. The 7-day genealogy cruise takes place beginning September 22, 2017 and visits the Pacific Coast on Royal Caribbean’s luxurious Explorer Of The Seas ship.
 
Over a seven-day period, MacEntee will offer presentations related to genealogy technology. He will join Legacy Family Tree’s Geoff Rasmussen and others who will offer classes on Legacy and other genealogy methodologies.
 
The 14th annual Legacy Genealogy Cruise, starts in Seattle, Washington and visits Astoria, Oregon; San Francisco, California; and Victoria, British Columbia.
 
For more information, or to register, visit http://legacyfamilytree.com/CruiseInfo_2017.asp. Not only will you have the vacation of a lifetime, but you will do so in good company with other genealogists.

Hope to see you all there!


Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America - free webinar by Peggy Lauritzen, AG now online for limited time

2017-03-01-image500blog

The recording of Wednesday's webinar, "Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America" by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

It is frequently assumed that the only enslaved Americans were those brought on the slave ships from Africa. Yet, an estimated one-half of early immigrants came to America as apprentices, indentured servants, and redemptioners. And, a good many of those were children.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 31 minute recording of "Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 477 classes, 662 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,193 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • 50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know by Gena Philibert-Ortega. March 8.
  • Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips by Cari Taplin, CG. March 10.
  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. March 15.
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Top 10 Genealogy Webinars of February 2017

We've tallied the numbers and made a list of the Top 10 FamilyTreeWebinars.com classes for February 2017! Are your favorite topics or instructors among the list? Need something new to learn? Use the list to get inspired!

Top10

Each month thousands of Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers head for the library to learn new skills and techniques to help improve their genealogy research. Among the now-476 genealogy classes in the members-only library, these were the most frequently played during the month of February 2017.  They aren't necessarily the newest classes but rather the topics that were sought out by our members.

Have you seen any of these classes? Are these among your favorites too? Some of these classes (and topics) might be new to you! Get inspired to learn more and make your genealogy journey more fun!

The Top 10 for February 2017

1. Be Your Own Digital Archivist: Preserve Your Research by Cyndi Ingle

2. The WHO of Genetic Genealogy by Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D.

3. Photography for Genealogy by Nicka Smith

4. Finding Missing Persons With DNA Testing by Diahan Southard

5. Deciphering German Script by Gail Blankenau

6. Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument by Karen Stanbary, CG

7. Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners by Geoff Rasmussen

8. Playing Nice In The Genealogy Sandbox by Thomas MacEntee

9. Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research by Lisa Louise Cooke

10. Writing Up Your Research by Michael J. Leclerc, CG

The Runner-Ups

11. Foundations in DNA 1 of 5: Genealogy and DNA by Blaine Bettinger

12. Strategies to Find the Most Challenging Ancestors with Autosomal DNA Data by James M. Baker, PhD, CG

13. PedigreeMap - an Interactive Map of Your Family History by Daniel Horowitz and Uri Gonen

14. Tips and Tricks to Organizing Your Genealogy by Shannon Combs-Bennett

15. Sources and Citations Made Simple, Standard, and Powerful by Geoff Rasmussen

16. Miners, Cattlemen, Merchants & More: Find Your Colorado Roots by Annette Burke Lyttle

17. Opening Pandora’s Box: Using DNA to Find an Unexpected, Improper Ancestor by James M. Baker, PhD, CG

18. Legacy Family Tree and FamilySearch Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen

19. How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby

20. Foundations in DNA 2 of 5: DNA Overview by Blaine Bettinger

Access to classes in the Legacy Family Tree Webinar library are available with an annual or monthly membership. Not a member? Become one! Or watch one of our free classes here.


A Simple Tip to Bust Genealogy Brick Walls

A Simple Tip to Bust Genealogy Brick Walls

I was recently reminded of a simple yet effective tip for bringing down brick walls.

Yesterday one of my DNA matches contacted me suggesting that we might be connected through the Bair family. That got my attention because the Bairs are one of my brick walls.

Before I go any further, let me tell you that I am an ancestral DNA addict! Not because I think that there is a magic DNA bullet that is going to bring down my brick walls, rather because it might provide the simplest hint that I hadn't seen before. That hint, combined with good old fashioned genealogy research is what solves mysteries.

My new cousin shared her online Ancestry tree with me so that I could see where we might connect. She had already taken a look at my tree. She pointed out that "My Bair's were in Tuscarawas Co., OH, for a time, and Anna Bonfield that you have in your tree died in Tuscarawas Co." She continued, "I would think based on shared DNA our match would be a good ways back, so we just mightn't find it, but it still would be interesting to see if your Bair's relate to the Tuscarawas Bair's."

Anna Bonfield is not a Bair so at first I discounted that. Too hasty, of course! Anna is married to a Bair - my third great grandfather, Jesse Bair.

I decided to look at the information I had on Jesse Bair. Jesse Bair was born 11 Nov 1814 in Adams County, Pennsylvania. Further scanning of his life showed locations such as Stark County, Ohio; St. Louis, Missouri; and St. Clair, Illinois. Jesse's adult life is pretty clear to me but his parents and roots in Pennsylvania are a mystery.

His wife's death in Tuscarawas, Ohio was nagging at me.

So I went to my Legacy database and did a search for all individuals whose death place or birth place contained Tuscarawas. I didn't bother with listing towns or a state because Tuscarawas is such a unique name. I then selected Create List. 

Searching Legacy Family Tree for individuals in Tuscarawas County


The results brought up, as expected, Anna Bonfield, but also her son James K.P. Bair. A quick peek at his profile showed that he was born in Dover, Tuscarawas, Ohio. I was so focused on my ancestors that I forgot to look at collateral relatives! James is the brother of my second great grandmother, Anna Elizabeth Bair (1850-1881). James' birth places my ancestors right in the same location as the ancestors  of my new distant cousin. Her Jonas Bair married and raised children in Tuscarawas, Ohio for twenty years before heading further west. It places him in the town of Dover exactly at the time my Jesse Bair was there.

James K.P. Bair was born in Tuscarawas County Ohio.
Surprise! James K.P. Bair was born in Tuscarawas County Ohio.


What was my big mistake when researching my Bair brick wall? Not checking each location for other families of the same name!

A quick search in the 1850 census for Tuscarawas County, Ohio revealed over 150 Bairs! I'm only concerned with the oldest generation from Pennsylvania so I narrowed down my search to those born in Pennsylvania.  That brought 26 Bairs to my attention ranging in birth dates from 1791 to 1828. That date range means there's potential that Jesse's father could be hiding in plain sight in Tuscarawas County!

I haven't brought down my brick wall yet. My next task is good old fashioned genealogy research. I need to recreate the Bair families in Tuscarawas County. Yes, it will be a lot of work but if it helps me find parents or siblings for Jesse Bair then it will be worth it!

For more brick wall tips check out "Ten Brick Wall Tips for Beginners" in the Legacy library.

 

Marian Pierre-Louis is the Social Media Marketing Manager for Legacy Family Tree. She is also a speaker, writer and the host of The Genealogy Professional podcast. Check out her webinars in the Legacy library.

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Tuesday's Tip - Label Those Tags!

  Legacy Family Tree Tuesday's Tip - Label Those Tags!

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques. 

Label Those Tags!

Whenever you use tagging (see the numbered boxes in the image 1-9 - those are tags), make sure you go to TOOLS > ADVANCED TAGGING and label the tags so that you know what is on what tag. It is VERY easy to forget what you have tagged especially if you have multiple tags in play. If you want to see what a particular tag means, you don't have to go back to this screen, you can simply hover over that tag number in the Family View or Pedigree View. 

In the example below, Tag 1 is used to help find some of Geoff's best ancestors!

Use Advanced Tagging to Label Your Tags!


For more about advanced tagging see this article: http://support.legacyfamilytree.com/article/AA-00949/0/Tagging-Advanced-Tagging.html

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.