Three New Canadian Webinars Released

If you have ancestors from Canada, head straight for the Legacy Family Tree Webinars Library!  With the addition of three new webinars, Legacy now has seven classes to help you locate your Canadian ancestors.

The new webinars include:

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research! All three of these new classes are bonus webinars in the Legacy library. The webinar previews are always free.

Researching Your 20th Century Canadian Ancestors

Did your parents, grandparents or great-grandparents live most of their lives in 20th century Canada? Finding information after 1939 can be tricky but there are resources available if you know where to look. Discover how you can add the missing details to the lives of your 20th century ancestors and relatives.

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Maximizing the Library and Archives Canada Website

Library and Archives Canada website is an excellent resource for genealogists but it can be confusing to find what you’re looking for. Learn how to get the maximum benefit of the free online databases, discover strategies to get results and explore new collections.

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Locating Your Forgotten Children - British Home Children in Canada

For seventy years (1869-1939) over 100,000 destitute children were sent from British streets and orphanages to Canada to become domestic help and farm hands. With over fifty sending agencies, these children were primarily placed in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, among other locations. One in ten Canadian’s are now descendants of Home Children. This program is an unknown piece of relatively recent history in Canada. We will learn about the program itself, and how to go about locating records and identifying if an ancestor was British Home Child sent to Canada.

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These webinars join four excellent Canadian webinars already in the library:

 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 291 classes in the library (433 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 1,264 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

 We've got a brand new line up of speakers for 2016! All live webinars are free to watch.

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Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

 

 

 

 

 


New! Register for multiple webinars at once

Our Legacy Family Tree Webinar Series, one of the hottest things in genealogy, just got even better. Hard to believe, especially since we just announced our amazing 2016 lineup with 62 new live webinars to choose from! We have now added the ability to register for multiple webinars at once.

Just fill out your registration information once (name, email, location), add a check mark next to each live webinar you wish to attend, and click the Register button. Done.

And if that's still too many clicks, just check the very top box and we'll automatically add the check marks for you!

Checkmark

After registering, check your inbox to ensure that you receive the confirmation email for each webinar you signed up for. (If not, check your spam/junk folder, or contact support@gotowebinar.com and request that they check their "Blocked Email Filter" for your email address.)

Register - it's free!

Registration for all 62 live webinars in 2016 is now open. 

Register

Check your registration status

You can also check to see which live webinars you have already registered for. Just click the Have I Already Registered? link in the upper right and sign in (it's a perk for webinar subscribers). The green check marks will appear for those that you have signed up for.

Registered

Membership benefits

While all of our live webinars are free, you can have access to the recordings of all of our past webinars by becoming an annual or monthly webinar subscriber. Look at what members receive:

  • Unlimited access to our recorded webinars for the during of your membership (currently 291 classes, 434 hours)
  • Unlimited access to the instructors' handouts (currently 1,264 pages)
  • Access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • Occasional members-only webinars
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • 5% off anything in the FamilyTreeWebinars.com store (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Subscribe today!

With all of these membership benefits, what are you waiting for?

Yearly membership - $49.95

Monthly membership - $9.95


Act today to claim your gifts from Legacy!

To Celebrate the holidays, Legacy is pleased to share two gifts with you

(but don't delay, these won't last!)

1. Give a gift and claim your own!

Gift50

Purchase a $50 Legacy e-Gift Card for your loved one and receive a coupon code in the amount of $10 for you to use with your next purchase in the Legacy Family Tree Webinars store.

Your loved one can use their gift card for anything in the store including:

  • Legacy Family Tree software
  • An annual webinar membership
  • How-to books
  • Add-on software
  • Legacy QuickGuides
  • lots more

While your loved one is getting settled into their new software by watching free Legacy training videos, you can decide how you'll spend your $10 gift! Perhaps you'll want to put it towards a new Flip-Pal scanner or a Legacy Family Tree Webinars monthly or annual membership. Maybe you'd like to stock up on a few Legacy QuickGuides. The best part is you get to decide!

Act fast, this offer expires at midnight on Thursday, December 24, 2015!

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2. Enjoy a Legacy Family Tree Webinar on Us!

We've opened up the library and made one of our favorite members-only videos available to the public for the holiday weekend. From now through Sunday, December 27, 2015 you can watch Digital Images for Genealogists and Technologists: Scanning, Organizing, Editing, and Sharing Your Digital Images by Geoff Rasmussen for free!

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 This is our way of saying "Thank You" for being a Legacy Family Tree customer and community member!


How did I miss THIS the first time? and tips for using Legacy

How did I miss this the first time around?

I'll give myself a little leeway for overlooking it, for I was a beginning, inexperienced researcher at the time. But if I hadn't been careful with the rest of my research the results could have been disastrous.

Inspired by Mark Lowe's most recent webinar I decided to give the research of my 6th great-grandfather, John McCall, another shot. Knowing that researching backwards (from the end of the ancestor's life) is often good genealogical methodology, I opened up his Individual's Information screen in Legacy and focused on his will.

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I clicked on the Will event and clicked the Edit button to view the will's transcription I had made years ago. I was looking specifically for the names of any friends, associates, or neighbors (otherwise referred to as the FAN club). Since John's origins have been difficult to trace, I would begin to study the lives of those around him. If I can learn where they came from, perhaps it would help me learn where John came from too.

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In the transcription I noticed that there were several words that were represented with --- indicating to me that at the time I made the transcription I was unable to decipher the handwriting. I then noticed that the Media Gallery button was still black/white. In Legacy this is an indication that I've not yet linked a picture to the event.

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Apparently I had not yet added the digital image of the will to this Will event so I browsed my digital filing system to see if I had scanned it yet. (Learn more about my digital filing system in Digital Imaging Essentials.)

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Nope. So I went to my physical filing system and quickly located all of John's original documents. Thanks to the filing system I use I was able to find John's section in a few seconds. All of his documents are filed behind tab #7853. This corresponds to his Marriage Record Identification number that is shown in the lower right of Legacy. (To learn more about the filing system, click here.)

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The photocopy of the microfilmed will was still there, but was of such poor quality that I really needed to see the original again. FamilySearch's Historical Record Collections appeared to have these records online now.

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Pretty quickly I found John's will. Wow. All of this took just minutes. What a different experience this is today compared to when I originally looked for his will.

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 And then I saw it. What I saw could make all the difference in solving a genealogy case. Here's the first line of John's will: 

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Compare that with the first line of my transcription:

I John McCall of Washington County & State of Tennessee

Did you notice what was missing from my transcription? Senior. This 6-letter word is a big deal. It infers that there is more than one John McCall. While it usually means that this person had a son of the same name, it could also mean there were two John McCalls in town, and this was the elder of the two. Regardless, omitting that word from my transcription is kind of important. Thankfully I've already studied the entire community to identify all McCalls in the area and have learned there are only two Johns - the John who authored this will, and his son.

What does this teach us? First, while there is a place in our research for referring to abstracts or transcriptions, we should always try to consult the original record. Second, take another at your documents. I'm a better researcher today than I was back then. I'm going to see things today with fresh and experienced eyes. You might even have someone else take a look at your ancestor's documents - they might see something you've overlooked. There may be new clues in the records you already have.

More Evidence/Methodology Tips

Learn more genealogy methodology from genealogy's experts at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. We've got at least these 10 webinars in the library that will help you see your records with fresh, experienced eyes.

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Tuesday's Tip - Attaching Document Files

  TT - Attaching Document Files


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Attaching Document Files

I write up case studies and proof arguments using MS Word. I also have a One-Name Study and using Excel spreadsheets to analyze my data is very important. I link these documents to Legacy's Media Gallery (which media gallery depends on what the data is).

I can open the Media Gallery, double click on the linked document, and the document will open and I can edit it. When I am done I simply close the document and the Media Gallery automatically has the most current version (Legacy links to the documents, it doesn't embed them). This saves me time because I never have to leave Legacy to open Word or Excel separately. It is important to me to keep all my genealogy information accessible in one program, Legacy.

There are individual media galleries, marriage media galleries, media galleries for locations, sources, source detail, mailing addresses, event addresses, repository addresses, and To-Do tasks.

For example, you can find a media gallery easily by looking at either the husband or the wife profile. See the media gallery highlighted with the red box below. When they gallery contains media the icon becomes colored.

MediaGallery2


When you click into the media gallery it looks like this:

MediaGallery


The different types of media will have different icons. The icon above is for documents.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 

 


What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records - free webinar by Mark Lowe now online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records" by Mark Lowe is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

Learn about the records (North Carolina & Tennessee) that exist for genealogists researching pre-statehood Tennessee (before 1796). Record types, finding aids, locations, and examples will be discussed and presented.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 45 minute recording of "What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records" PLUS the after-party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Holiday Sale

Through December 31, 2015, take $10 off any new Legacy Family Tree software. Plus discounts on Legacy QuickGuides, add-on software, how-to books and more have been discounted. No coupon required. Only at www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com.

Tennessee GenealogyLegacy QuickGuide: Tennessee Genealogy 2.95

Looking to find those elusive Volunteer State ancestors? The Tennessee Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including a timeline of Tennessee history events, tips on Tennessee research strategy, outline of major immigrant groups, and more. Also included are links to websites and resources covering vital records, church records, census records, as well as general Tennessee resources. This handy 8-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

Tennessee derives its name from the Yuchi Indian word “Tana-see”, meaning “The Meeting Place.” After reaching a population of over 60,000, Tennessee became a state on June 1, 1796. Some settlers moved on to Arkansas, Missouri, Texas and Oklahoma, while others remained to help the state become what it is today.

Click here to purchase for 2.95.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 288 classes, 434 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,260 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Tap Into Your Inner Private Eye - 9 Strategies for Finding Living Relatives by Lisa Louise Cooke. January 6.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. January 13.
  • Snagit Software for Genealogists by Michael Brophy. January 15.
  • The Basics of Virginia Research by Shannon Combs-Bennett. January 20.
  • The Paper-Less Genealogist by Denise May Levenick. January 27.
  • 7 Unique Technologies for Genealogy Discoveries at MyHeritage by Mike Mansfield. 1/29.
  • The Scots-Irish in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. February 10.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee. February 17.
  • Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk. February 19.
  • A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cyndi Ingle. February 24.
  • The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Michael Hall. March 2.
  • Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard. March 4.
  • How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow. March 9.
  • The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell. March 16.
  • Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. March 23.
  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. March 30.
  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


10 Steps to Scanning, Preserving and Sharing Your Photos (Part 1)

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If you have been following along with my previous blog posts - 10 Easy Steps to Organizing Family Photos Part I and Part II - you are ready to begin scanning, preserving and sharing those wonderful family photos you just organized.

1. Make a Plan

You need to decide on several things before you even begin to scan your photos. How will you organize your images on your computer? Will you organize by date? By event? By family? By surname? How will you name your files? What format will you use to scan your photos? What resolution should you scan in? What kind of scanner should you use? What is the end goal for your digital images? Are you burning the images to a CD-rom? Saving them to the cloud? The options are endless and you need to have some idea of how you will tackle each of these questions before you begin.

 

Organize Photos 1-5
Photo credit: Lorine McGinnis Schulze


In the steps below I am going to walk you through making these decisions and starting your scanning project. It’s important that you realize there are many ways to tackle a project such as this one. That means many of your decisions are going to be personal choices.

2. Decide on your Folder Hierarchy

Create your electronic file hierarchy system first, before you begin to reorganize the electronic documents you want to file within it. With your system in place, you easily can drag and drop files into the appropriate file folders, without stopping to create a new file folder.

Set up your file structure within one master folder; this makes backing up and moving stored files easier. I like to create a master folder within the “PICTURES” section of my Mac hard-drive. On my Windows 10 Computer I create a master folder by choosing File Explorer then Pictures Directory.

You may want to create an electronic file hierarchy structure that is the same as your paper file organization. This keeps data organized under one structure instead of trying to maintain multiple structures. Whatever method you choose, be consistent!

* Create subfolder categories. Depending how many photos I have for a surname (i.e. how many image files I end up with) I create subfolders. So for my Simpson family I would have a main folder labelled “Photos Simpson” and then subfolders for each of the children and the parents. In case you are wondering I start the folders with the word “Photos” so they are all together. But for my McGinnis family where I have very few photos I could just have a main folder for that surname.

There is a little “trick” you can use to cut down on your typing and at the same time be extremely consistent. If you set up your subfolders with the surname of each family (for example Simpson), and within each subfolder you have the identical subfolders of “Ancestor <name of ancestor>” “Parents” “Siblings” you can copy and paste these 3 subfolders into every surname folder you have created.

Using my Simpson surname folder as an example, my Simpson ancestor is my grandmother Ruth. I have photos of her, her parents, and all her siblings over many years. So in the subfolder “Ancestor Ruth” I put all photos of Ruth from birth to marriage. In the subfolder “Parents” I put all photos of her parents. In “Siblings” I am going to create even more subfolders with the names of each of her siblings. I have too many photos of them to lump them all together.

 LFT-folder-hierarchy-example

3. Understand Scanning Resolution, Image Format & Color vs Black & White

Resolution (DPI): The higher the resolution (this is your DPI) the better the scan is. The downside is that higher resolutions are larger files and thus take up more room on your hard drive. DPI stands for dots per inch.

300 DPI is safe and will give you a decent digital image at the same size as the original photo. If you are going to enlarge your photo you will need to increase the DPI for scanning. 600 DPI is the most recommended for good quality

Remember that you cannot make a blurry photo clear no matter how high your DPI settings are.

Format: The most common image file formats (the most important for cameras, printing, scanning, and internet use) are JPG, TIF, PNG, and GIF

  • JPG files are small, so they take up less room on your hard drive, but their quality is not as good as other formats. Each time you alter a jpg file the quality suffers.
  • GIF – the downside is reduced colors. It uses compression and thus reduces quality.
  • PNG is similar to TIF in that it is lossless but similiar to jpg and gif it is intended for the internet because of its compact files size.
  • TIF is considered the highest quality file type because it is a "lossless" format (ie the file quality remains the same no matter how many times your save it).

The recommended format for photo scanning is TIF.

Color vs Black & White Scanning: Usually scanning in color works best, even for black and white photos. Some badly damaged black and white photos may be better scanned in black and white if you plan on editing or restoring the photos later.

We'll continue with 7 more steps to scanning, preserving and sharing your treasured photos in Part 2.

 

Be sure to see "Digital Images for Genealogists and Technologists: Scanning, Organizing, Editing, and Sharing Your Digital Images" by Geoff Rasmussen in the Legacy Webinar Library. You can also check out the Digital Imaging Essentials book by Geoff Rasmussen.

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Register for Webinar Friday - What Happened to the State of Frankland: Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe

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In our last live webinar of 2015, Mark Lowe will teach us about something that even here in America, little of us know anything about - the state of Frankland.

You will learn about the records (North Carolina & Tennessee) that exist for genealogists researching pre-statehood Tennessee (before 1796). Record types, finding aids, locations, and examples will be discussed and presented.

Join us and Certified Genealogist, Mark Lowe, for the live webinar Friday, December 18, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Lowemark-144J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA is a full-time professional genealogist, author, and lecturer. While sharing personal experiences that help beginning and experienced researchers gain new skills and insights for research, he specializes in original records and manuscripts throughout the South. Mark lives in Robertson County, Tennessee that lies in northern Middle Tennessee along the Kentucky border.

Lowe also serves as the Course Coordinator for ‘Research in the South’ at  IGHR (Samford University), for the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG)  and is Director of the Regional In-depth Genealogical Studies Alliance (RIGS Alliance), learning sessions and hands-on research focusing on original documents and manuscripts at regional archives. Mark has worked on several genealogical television series includingAfrican American Lives 2, Who Do You Think You Are? and UnXplained Events.

Mark has published in the Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly (APGQ), National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ), the Genealogical Speakers’ Guild SPEAK!, The Longhunter (So. Ky. Genealogical Society), The Middle Tennessee Genealogical Society Quarterlyand other local society publications. His own publications include Robertson County Tennessee Marriage Book 2 1859-1873. He formerly was the President of the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG), President for the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS), and Vice President of the Genealogical Speakers Guild (GSG). He is the former President of the Southern Kentucky Genealogical Society. Mark is a Certified Genealogist and a Fellow of the Utah Genealogical Society, and was awarded the Graham T. Smallwood award by the Association of Professional Genealogists.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Friday, December 18, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Pointing Fingers at Ancestors Siblings: Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research - free webinar by Marian Pierre-Louis online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "Pointing Fingers at Ancestors Siblings: Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research" by Marian Pierre-Louis is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

Your brick wall is giving you countless headaches and troubles. Perhaps it's time to take a fresh look at different people in your family tree. In this webinar we will talk about doing in-depth research on cousins and siblings in order to remove genealogy obstacles.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 57 minute recording of "Pointing Fingers at Ancestors Siblings: Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research" PLUS the after-party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Holiday Sale

Through December 31, 2015, take $10 off any new Legacy Family Tree software. Plus discounts on Legacy QuickGuides, add-on software, how-to books and more have been discounted. No coupon required. Only at www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com.

QDUNRAVELLegacy QuickGuide: Unraveling Brick Wall Mysteries 2.95

Chances are, if you have spent any time at all working to compile your family history, you have run into difficulty finding at least one elusive relative . . . maybe even several of them! Within the genealogy community this experience is commonly referred to as a “brick wall.” Some brick walls may seem impossible to solve; however, as my mother often told me, “Nothing in life is impossible, some things just take a little longer to accomplish than others.”
 
Seemingly complex problems can often be best solved if we break down these problems into smaller components. Whether you are new to genealogy, or have been researching for many years, try breaking down your problem into smaller steps and follow the easy back-to-basics Brick Wall Process. Ultimately, the secret to Unraveling Brick Wall Mysteries will rely upon the utilization of the three P’s: Process, Persistence and Patience.
 
The Unraveling Brick Wall Mysteries Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including an outline of effective strategy, tips and tricks and links to resources. This handy 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

Click here to purchase for 2.95.

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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. December 18.
  • Tap Into Your Inner Private Eye - 9 Strategies for Finding Living Relatives by Lisa Louise Cooke. January 6.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. January 13.
  • Snagit Software for Genealogists by Michael Brophy. January 15.
  • The Basics of Virginia Research by Shannon Combs-Bennett. January 20.
  • The Paper-Less Genealogist by Denise May Levenick. January 27.
  • The Scots-Irish in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. February 10.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee. February 17.
  • Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk. February 19.
  • A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cyndi Ingle. February 24.
  • The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Michael Hall. March 2.
  • Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard. March 4.
  • How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow. March 9.
  • The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell. March 16.
  • Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. March 23.
  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. March 30.
  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Legacy Tip - Who Was Alive in 1939? Or in ____?

Which of your ancestors were alive in 1939? Or in 1880? Or in 1861? Or in fill in the blank?

With the recent announcement of the new 1939 Register for England and Wales lots of us (myself included) are wondering if our cousins are included in this wonderful collection. A special tool in Legacy Family Tree makes it simple to know who would have been alive and living somewhere in England in 1939. OR, who would have been alive to be counted in the 1880 U.S. census? OR, who would have been alive at the start of the Civil War? OR, fill in the blank....

Here's how to get a list of who would have been alive on a certain date.

1) In Legacy Family Tree go to Search > Census List.

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2) Fill in the place (England), the date (1939), and deselect the age and gender options (since we're looking for everyone in 1939 in England) and click the Create a Search List button.

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My Search List shows 44 individuals:

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Instead of clicking on the Create a Search List button, clicking on the Preview a Census List Report displays the results in this format:

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Here, the birth date, death date, age on date, and possible location (with a percentage of likelihood they would be found there) are shown.

And it keeps getting better. Before printing the report, turn on the options for "include married names for wives" and "include surrounding relatives". Both options would make it easier to find them in the records.

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This so-called "Census List" report really could be renamed to "Who Was Alive On?" What other ways could the report be used?

  • Who was alive during the ____ War (now look for their military records)?
  • Who was alive when the printing press was invented?
  • Who was alive during the great potato famine?
  • Who could I find on the 1892 New York state census?
  • And so on...

The Census List tool is a deluxe feature of Legacy Family Tree. To upgrade to Legacy Deluxe, click here.