Using Yearbooks For Genealogical Research

Looking through our school yearbooks evoke for many of us cherished memories of youth. They may almost present laughable (for me personally, cringe-worthy) moments when we see awkward photos of ourselves. However, for genealogical research, yearbooks are an important resource for several reasons. Consider that when we research our ancestors, most of the records begin in their adult life, when they are legally able to marry, vote, and own property. The formative childhood years are often lost to time, but researching in yearbooks and other types of school records are an important avenue for genealogists.

This post focuses on the importance of yearbooks because in many cases, other types of school records such as transcripts and student files are lost or difficult to access. There may exist a variety of records pertaining to schools and students. However, a discussion about those will be for another post. Yearbooks are the best place to start for tracking ancestors as students or teachers, because they are the most available and complete source to date of those who attended or worked in the school.

There’s not a whole lot of history on why and when yearbooks were created, but beginning in the 1600s, students compiled their own yearbooks with newspaper clippings, dried flowers, and personal musings. The first published yearbooks were created in the 19th century, which were traditionally called annuals or class books. Soon after the daguerreotype was invented, a few schools had photographers come into take pictures of graduating students, but the yearbook photograph did not become mainstream until the invention of the Kodak Camera in 1888. Around this time is when yearbook publication in schools begins to greatly increase in popularity and most collections date back to at least the early 20th century. With that in mind, yearbooks may only be useful for genealogy in the more recent generations of our family trees.

Photographs of Graduates, Lebanon Valley College Bizarre (1914). Image source: Internet Archive.
Photographs of Graduates, Lebanon Valley College Bizarre (1914). Image source: Internet Archive.


First and foremost, yearbooks are able to put our ancestors in a time and place. Beyond that, they offer a variety of detail we couldn’t glean from traditional genealogical sources. In yearbook listings, particularly from colleges, they offer a detailed record of a student’s experience at the school. They include any student clubs or organizations they belonged to and sometimes provide insight into what they might have been like in terms of personality, academic performance, and other personal qualities. I have seen some which include date and place of birth, but this is less common. The military and its academies have published annuals for a long time, which could facilitate in a genealogist’s search for military records of their ancestor. If an ancestor were absent altogether from a particular school’s yearbooks even when they had been known to attend, it would provide a strong clue they either dropped out or transferred to another institution.

Amherst College Classbook (1903). Image Source: Digital Commonwealth. 
Amherst College Classbook (1903). Image Source: Digital Commonwealth. 

 

When you are using yearbooks for genealogical research, examine the entirety of it’s contents. They are never indexed, so take your time with them to find useful pieces of information. I would suggest surveying the entire listing for each class because these are people your ancestor interacted with directly, thus belonging to the “FAN” club and could prove significant in further research.

There are often pages that include personal musings, class histories, photographs of student life and all the student-run organizations. They do provide faculty information and perhaps even photographs of the faculty, so it’s important to think of yearbooks as more useful than just for researching students. Many yearbooks also included advertisements from businesses that sponsored the publication of the yearbook or were closely affiliated with the school, so in some cases, yearbooks have information on ancestors who didn’t attend school at all.

Almeida' Bus Service Advertisement in New Bedford Textile School's Yearbook The Fabricator (1961). Image Source: Internet Archive. 
Almeida' Bus Service Advertisement in New Bedford Textile School's Yearbook The Fabricator (1961). Image Source: Internet Archive. 

 

Finding yearbooks is relatively easy because they don’t contain sensitive information like other school records and survive in much greater numbers. They could exist in physical, digital, or both forms of publication. It’s best to start by contacting the school directly or library for the town in which your ancestor attended school for the whereabouts of physical copies. In many cases, other local repositories such as historical and genealogical societies have copies of yearbooks as well. If you can’t make an in-person visit, they should be able to do a lookup if you know the school and years of attendance/graduation.

Thousands of volumes of old yearbooks are available online too. Many yearbook sites were created to help facilitate class reunions, but they help genealogists too. Relatively Curious has a great post on yearbook research, listing important sites and databases. Here are a few sites to start with:

Internet Archive

Ancestry.com

Cyndi’s List

Classmates.com

Yearbooks provide us with a fascinating perspective on our ancestors' lives and serve as an important document of social history. What have you learned about your ancestors through yearbooks?

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Jake Fletcher is a professional genealogist, educator and blogger. Jake has been researching and writing about his ancestors since 2008 on his research blog. He currently volunteers as a research assistant at the National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts and is Vice President of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists (NEAPG).


Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life - free webinar by Gena Philibert-Ortega now online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life" by Gena Philibert-Ortega is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com/BCG. 

Webinar Description

Social history is an important part of genealogical research. In this presentation we will go over 25 websites that will help you better understand your ancestor's life which will then lead you to more resources.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 23 minute recording of "Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Civil Law Notaries - Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History by Melanie D. Holtz, CG. November 15. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is... and isn't by Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 20. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Two More California Webinars added to the Legacy Library

California

Got ancestors in The Golden State? We've got two new webinars to help you find them! Announcing an additional two classes in our California Research series to bring the total  now to six:

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research! Both of these new classes are bonus webinars in the webinar library. The webinar previews are always free.

California Newspapers and Digitized Books

In this webinar we look at the printed word. Newspapers provide us with the details of everyday life that are hard to find anywhere else. Digitized books span the realm of the local history and biography which helps to tell the story of places and people. Where can you find Californian newspapers and digitized books? Many times you can find what you need online through digitization projects, subscription and free websites but for those times you can’t find what you need, knowing what is available and where is important.

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Going to the Courthouse

Not all California courthouse records are at the courthouse. And for most courthouses, the researcher must rely on paying for a search which may or may not result in the records they need. Knowing the structure of the California court system and how to access records is important in order to avoid frustration. We’ll look at what must be requested, what is available online through the courthouse website, what can be searched in person, what is available at various archives, FamilySearch and other websites.

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These join four California webinars already in the library:

 Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

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Look at our lineup of speakers for 2016! All live webinars are free to watch.

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Finding and Understanding Removal Orders in England

FB-removal-crest

A search of the National Archives United Kingdom website can provide many interesting documents for genealogy research. One of the items I found was a Removal Order for my 5th great grandfather Thomas Blanden. Thomas was born in Wenhaston, Suffolk, England in 1739, enlisted in the Suffolk Militia as a drummer at the age of 20, and was discharged in bad health 28 years later.

removal order thomas blandon mary jackson-1
Removal Order FC189/G4/14. Suffolk, Ipswich Branch, Wenhaston Paris Records Date: 1778

Removal Orders were new to me so after ordering the documents from the Archives I did my homework and researched the history of Removal Orders. In 1662 England, an Act of Settlement was passed to define which parish had responsibility for a poor person. A child's birthplace was its place of settlement, unless its mother had a settlement certificate from somewhere else stating that the unborn child was included on the certificate. From the age of 7 the child could have been apprenticed and gained a settlement for himself or he could have obtained settlement for himself by service by the time he was 16.

After 1697, the poor were allowed to enter any parish in search of work, as long as they had a Settlement Certificate signed by the church wardens and overseers of their place of settlement and two magistrates guaranteeing to receive them back should they become chargeable. No one was allowed to move from town to town without the appropriate documentation.

If a person entered a parish in which he did not have official settlement, and if it seemed likely he might become chargeable to the new parish, then an examination would be made by the justices or parish overseers. From this examination on oath, the justices would determine if that person had the means to sustain himself and, if not, which was that person's parish of settlement. As a result of the examination the intruder would then either be allowed to stay, or would be removed by means of what was known as a Removal Order.

A Removal Order was sometimes accompanied by a written pass to the parish of settlement showing the route to be taken. This would apply even within a city or town which consisted of more than one parish. Your parish of settlement was obliged to take you back.

Removal Orders would often take a person or a family back to a place of settlement miles across the country, sometimes to a parish they had only known briefly as a small child. It was not uncommon for a husband and wife to have their children taken from them, each being removed to separate scattered parishes.

On 18 May 1778, a Removal Order was served on my 5th Great Grandfather who was recorded as Thomas Blandon, Drummer in the Western Battalion Militia of Suffolk. Thomas, Mary, his wife, and their children Mary, Elizabeth, Ann, Thomas & Susannah were ordered removed from St. James, Bury St. Edmunds and sent to Wenhaston.

The order made me wonder what the circumstances were surrounding Thomas and his run of bad luck. Having found a Chelsea Pensioner record for Thomas dated 1787 I knew that he had been in the Army for 28 years and was being discharged with “bad eyes” and “worn out.” No doubt he couldn’t provide much, if any, income to support his family and thus the Parish did not want to accept responsibility for supporting them.

 

Royal Hospital, Chelsea: Discharge Documents of Pensioners WO 121/1/38
Royal Hospital, Chelsea: Discharge Documents of Pensioners WO 121/1/38



A Settlement Certificate would have more genealogical information but since I did not find one for Thomas I was happy to see that the Removal Order gave the ages of each of Thomas and Mary's children – they were aged 1 to 13 years old. How difficult it must have been to be uprooted from friends and neighbours, and sent from the Parish of St. James back to the parish of Thomas’ birth in Wenhaston.

To my surprise the Removal Order was a form with blanks to fill in by the clerk recording the details, which indicates to me that there must have been a lot of them served! What a wonderful item to find. If you have English ancestors, why not have a look on the National Archives website? You might be surprised at what is there. If you have not used this resource, see How to Use the National Archives United Kingdom Website to Obtain Ancestor Documents.

UPDATE: Thanks to Helen Smith for pointing out that most settlement examinations, removal orders will be found in parish chest material for individual parishes so should be found in County Archives rather than in the UK National Archive. Genealogists can use the Discovery Search Engine at the UK National Archives but if a search does not return results they are advised to go directly to the county Archive of interest.

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.


Educational Preparation for Certification - free BCG webinar by Angela Packer McGhie, CG now online for limited time

2016-10-18-image500blog-bcg

The recording of tonight's webinar, "Educational Preparation for Certification: Many Paths to the Same Goal" by Angela Packer McGhie, CG is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com/BCG. 

Webinar Description

Developing the skills necessary to produce work that meets the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) takes time and effort. This presentation will highlight some of the educational options that are helpful in learning about each element of the GPS including thorough research, citations, evidence analysis, written conclusions; as well as each element of the application portfolio. The goal is to both understand and be able to meet genealogy standards. There are many educational paths to choose from, and both formal and independent study options will be discussed.

This webinar is hosted and sponsored by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 14 minute recording of "Educational Preparation for Certification: Many Paths to the Same Goal" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

STDTrans200Genealogy Standards - 12.95

"Accuracy is fundamental to genealogical research. Without it, a family's history would be fiction. This manual presents the standards family historians use to obtain valid results.
 
These standards apply to all genealogical research, whether shared privately or published. They also apply to personal research for clients, courts, and other employers. The standards address documentation; research planning and execution, including reasoning from evidence; compiling research results; genealogical education; and ongoing development of genealogical knowledge and skills.
 
BCG [Board for Certification of Genealogists] offers these standards to the field as a guide to sound genealogical research and a way to assess the research outcomes that genealogists produce. They are standards for anyone who seeks to research and portray accurately people's lives, relationships, and histories.
 
Family historians depend upon thousands of people unknown to them. They exchange research with others; copy information from books and databases; and write libraries, societies, and government offices. At times they even hire professionals to do legwork in distant areas and trust strangers to solve important problems. But how can a researcher be assured that he or she is producing or receiving reliable results? This new edition of the official manual from the Board of Certification for Genealogists provides a standard by which all genealogists can pattern their work.
 
Paperback: 100 pages, 5.5" x 8.5"

Click here to purchase for 12.95.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 429 classes, 599 hours of genealogy education)
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  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Civil Law Notaries - Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History by Melanie D. Holtz, CG. November 15. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is... and isn't by Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 20. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega

Register

Social history is an important part of genealogical research. In this presentation we will go over 25 websites that will help you better understand your ancestor's life which will then lead you to more resources.

Join us and Gena Philibert-Ortega for the live webinar Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

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Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

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About the presenter

GenaOrtega-144x144Gena Philibert-Ortega holds a Master's degree in Interdisciplinary Studies (Psychology and Women's Studies) and a Master's degree in Religion. Presenting on various subjects involving genealogy, women's studies, and social history, Gena has spoken to groups throughout the United States as well as virtually to audiences worldwide. Gena is the author of hundreds of articles published in genealogy newsletters and magazines including FGS Forum, APG Quarterly, Internet Genealogy, Family Chronicle, Family Tree Magazine, GenWeekly and the WorldVitalRecords newsletter. Her writings can also be found on her blogs, Gena's Genealogy and Food.Family.Ephemera. She is the author of the books, From The Family Kitchen (F + WMedia, 2012), Cemeteries of the Eastern Sierra (Arcadia Publishing, 2007) and Putting the Pieces Together. Gena is the editor of the Utah Genealogical Association's journal Crossroads. An instructor for the National Institute for Genealogical Studies, Gena has written courses about social media and Google. She serves as a board member of the Utah Genealogical Association. Her current research interests include women's social history, community cookbooks, signature quilts and researching women's lives using material artifacts. Gena Philibert-Ortega is the author of IDG's monthly column, Remember the Ladies: Researching Your Female Ancestor. 

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Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at:

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  • 1pm Central
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Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
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  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Register for Webinar Tuesday - Educational Preparation for Certification: Many Paths to the Same Goal by Angela Packer McGhie, CG

Educational Preparation for Certification: Many Paths to the Same Goal by Angela Packer McGhie, CG

Developing the skills necessary to produce work that meets the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) takes time and effort. This presentation will highlight some of the educational BCG logooptions that are helpful in learning about each element of the GPS including thorough research, citations, evidence analysis, written conclusions; as well as each element of the
application portfolio. The goal is to both understand and be able to meet genealogy standards. There are many educational paths to choose from, and both formal and independent study options will be discussed.

This webinar is hosted and sponsored by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

Join us and Angela Packer McGhie, CG for the live webinar Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 8pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here.

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AngelaPackerMcGhie-144x144About the presenter

Angela Packer McGhie is the coordinator for the Intermediate Genealogy course at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research, and the coordinator of the Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. She served as the administrator of the ProGen Study Program from 2008-2014 and is now on the board of directors. Angela is an instructor at the Genealogical Institute on Federal Records, the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh, and the Virtual Institute on Genealogical Research. Angela has served on the education committee of the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG) and is the past president of the National Capital Area Chapter of APG. She is a contributing author for the APG Quarterly and was honored with a formal certificate of appreciation from the Association of Professional Genealogists for her leadership and service.

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With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at:

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  • 7pm Central
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  • 5pm Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Three Reasons You Should be Using Scrivener to Write Your Family History

It is no secret that I am an avid user of Scrivener, a multifaceted word processor and project management tool. I have been using this program for all of my personal and professional writing projects since 2011.

Three Reasons You Should be Using Scrivener to Write Your Family History


Here are three reasons why you will want to use this amazing tool for your family history and other writing projects.

  1. It’s Plot Perfect. Whether you are a visual writer who likes to storyboard, or if you prefer text outlines, you can use Scrivener your  way! When you start a new blank project, you will be see the “Binder” (located on the left-hand side), which is the source list showing all documents in the project.

    By default you’ll see three folders:

    The “Draft” board (called “Manuscript” in other Scrivener templates) is the main space where you type your text (you can compile everything in that folder for printing or export as one long document later on). You will have one Untitled Document showing. Simply add a title and then start typing. You can move sections around by dragging and dropping. Click the green plus sign (+) icon to add files or folders. Scrivener also lets you import files that you already have prepared in Microsoft Word or text based formats.

    As you work, Scrivener allow to easily “toggle” between its key modes: Corkboard (where you can summarize on “virtual index cards” the key points you want to cover—the virtual cards can easily be arranged in any order you like); Outline (use it if you prefer to control the structure of your work); and Scrivenings (this mode temporarily combines individual documents into a single text, allowing you to view some or all documents in a folder as though they were all part of one long text).

    There is another pane called the “Inspector” that offers additional features to help you manage your project so you can easily plot, plan, and outline away!  Watch the Storyboarding and Editing with Scrivener Bonus Webinar to learn the secrets of Scrivener storyboarding. 

Scrivener_corkboard

  1. It’s Research Ready. Scrivener has a designated Research folder where you can store notes, PDF files, images, etc. (not included in your final compiled document). Research is one of the three main container folders (the other two are Draft or Manuscript and Trash) automatically included in all of the Scrivener templates. Use the super handy Split Screen feature to have your research items there on the screen as you write. This saves you from having to open up your image or PDF viewer or other program while you are in writing mode. You can even add annotations, comments, footnotes and endnotes to your final output. Watch the Getting Started with Scrivener: Footnotes, Endnotes and Formatting bonus webinar to learn more.
  1. It Does all the Heavy Lifting. The true power of Scrivener resides in its “Compile” (Compile is just a fancy term for exporting your project into any number of final formats—print, eBook, Kindle, PDF, etc.). With compile you specify what Scrivener does/does not include, and how it should look. You will get a crash course in the key steps in the Compiling and Publishing with Scrivener bonus webinar. Mastering Compile takes some practice, so you should also refer to the Scrivener tutorials and forums for guidance.

Here’s a bonus tip: Start small! Begin with a smaller project like an ancestor profile or blog post rather than attempting to write a 200-page family history book your first time in. 

Scrivener is created by Literature and Latte and is available for purchase for use on Mac ($45) and Windows ($40). There is also a 30-day free trial available. Double click the Scrivener “S” icon on your desktop to open the program. Before you start your first project, take a few minutes to review the Scrivener manual for your and watch the helpful interactive tutorials.

I was pleased to be able to record a new five-part bonus webinar series on Scrivener for Legacy subscribers. 

The Legacy Bonus Webinars on Scrivener cover the following topics:

  1. Getting Started with Scrivener
  2. Storyboarding and Editing with Scrivener
  3. Footnotes, Endnotes and Formatting in Scrivener
  4. Compiling and Publishing with Scrivener
  5. Scrivener Ninja Tips and Tricks

Want even more Scrivener secrets? Pick up a  copy of my Scrivener for Genealogists QuickSheet (available for both Mac and Windows versions).

ScrivenerPC

 

Lisa A. Alzo, M.F.A. is a freelance writer, instructor and internationally recognized lecturer specializing in Eastern European genealogy, writing your family history, and finding female and immigrant ancestors.  She is the author of 10 books, including The Family Tree Polish, Czech and Slovak Genealogy Guide, and the award-winning Three Slovak Women.  Lisa is a frequent speaker for Legacy Family Tree Webinars, and blogs at The Accidental Genealogist. She can be reached at http://www.lisaalzo.com.


Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown - free webinar by Ursula C. Krause now online for limited time

2016-10-14-image500blog

Watch out Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, Lisa Alzo, Lisa Louise Cooke and all of our other wonderful webinar speakers! If we were to cast votes for our favorite speakers, Ursula C. Krause, after her magnificent webinar today, is sure to receive a good number of them. I've not seen so many "BEST WEBINAR EVER!" statements in a long time. Very well done today Ursula!

The recording of today's webinar, "Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown" by Ursula C. Krause is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Webinar Description

Can't find the place your German ancestors came from? This webinar will help you gather information on how to find the place they called home. We will look into passenger lists and emigration records as well as take a look at what information their name and their faith can provide.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 33 minute recording of "Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

GermanyTrace Your German Roots Online - 21.99

Click your way to German ancestors!

Explore your Germanic heritage from the comfort of your own computer! Trace Your German Roots Online highlights important German resources on popular genealogy websites including Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org, as well as lesser-known resources such as Archion.de. With helpful illustrated step-by-step instructions, you'll learn how to use each site to its fullest potential for German genealogy, including how to get around language barriers and navigate the various German states that have existed throughout the centuries. In addition, this book contains links to the best websites to consult when answering key German genealogy questions, from unpuzzling place names to locating living relatives in the old country.

Trace Your German Roots Online features:
  • Tips to find and use German databases, records, and research tools on Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org, and other popular genealogy websites
  • Guidance for helpful German-focused research websites, including help translating foreign-language sites
  • Recommended websites for accomplishing key German research tasks
  • Worksheets to log research progress and at-a-glance guides to help you identify important terms and resources
An ideal companion to author James M. Beidler's The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide, this book has the tools you need to take your German genealogy research to the next level. Whether your ancestors came from Bavaria, Baden, Berlin, or Bremen, this comprehensive guide will help you find your German ancestors on the Internet.

Paperback: 208 pages, 9" x 7"

Click here for more information or to purchase for 21.99.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 426 classes, 596 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,929pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Educational Preparation for Certification: Many Paths to the Same Goal by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. October 18. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Civil Law Notaries - Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History by Melanie D. Holtz, CG. November 15. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Legacy Tip: How do I enter adoptive parents?

When a child has been adopted he/she has two sets of parents, the biological set and the adoptive set.  It is very easy to enter two sets of parents in Legacy and this will allow you to follow both lines.  This is especially important now with DNA evidence leading adoptees to their biological families. 

In the Family View, the second icon from the left under the person you are working with is the Parents' icon which will bring up the Parents List.

You will do everything else on this screen.


You can see that you can add new parents here and you can also link to existing parents if they are already in your database.  After you add your new found biological parents this is what you will see.

Now that you have your unknown parents you can click the Add Father and Add Mother to enter the information you have about them.  Now you have this.


You only have one more thing to do.  You need to designate which set of parents are the adoptive parents.


Notice that I can mark the relationship as Private or Invisible.  I could highlight Expresso Coffee and Peeka Book and change their status to Biological but leaving the field blank is the default for biological parents.  It is up to you if you want to designate them this way.  To change which set of parents is preferred, highlight the set you want to show as preferred and then click the Select button at the top right.  The preferred parents will automatically display when you are navigating in the Family View.  If you want to switch to the other set of parents, hover to the side of the parents names and a bar will appear.  Click that bar and then you can rotate through the parents.