Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors - free webinar by Jim Beidler now online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors" by Jim Beidler is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Webinar Description

While there’s a galaxy of Internet sites that can help you with your German genealogy, some stars shine brighter than others – and it’s not just Ancestry and FamilySearch, although those two 500-pound canaries both have huge assets for those seeking Deutsch ancestors.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 46 minute recording of "Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - uber - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, May 23, 2016

GermanyTrace Your German Roots Online - 18.95

Click your way to German ancestors!

Explore your Germanic heritage from the comfort of your own computer! Trace Your German Roots Online highlights important German resources on popular genealogy websites including Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org, as well as lesser-known resources such as Archion.de. With helpful illustrated step-by-step instructions, you'll learn how to use each site to its fullest potential for German genealogy, including how to get around language barriers and navigate the various German states that have existed throughout the centuries. In addition, this book contains links to the best websites to consult when answering key German genealogy questions, from unpuzzling place names to locating living relatives in the old country.

Trace Your German Roots Online features:
  • Tips to find and use German databases, records, and research tools on Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org, and other popular genealogy websites
  • Guidance for helpful German-focused research websites, including help translating foreign-language sites
  • Recommended websites for accomplishing key German research tasks
  • Worksheets to log research progress and at-a-glance guides to help you identify important terms and resources
An ideal companion to author James M. Beidler's The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide, this book has the tools you need to take your German genealogy research to the next level. Whether your ancestors came from Bavaria, Baden, Berlin, or Bremen, this comprehensive guide will help you find your German ancestors on the Internet.

Click here to purchase for 18.95.

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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Squatters, Pre-emptioners and Thieves: Early Land Records - new BONUS webinar by Ruby Coleman now available

Land records are paramount in genealogical research. Learn about your ancestors who may have been squatters, a member of a claim club or transferred their presumptions. Land laws were often abused and those who took advantage of them are also discussed.

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research! This new class is a bonus webinar in the webinar library. The webinar previews are always free.

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Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

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Everyone Makes Mistakes: Why You Should Review Your Research Notes

Everyone Makes Mistakes

 

A few days ago I decided to have another look at some census records I obtained many years ago for my Peer ancestors in Pennsylvania. When the 1830 census first became available online I had quickly found, and copied, the information for the family. I wanted to verify what I’d copied.

I headed for Ancestry.com to search their census records. Using their wildcard feature which picks up variant spellings, I searched for Edward P*er in Pennsylvania in 1830.

An index transcription popped up. I was quite puzzled because the indexed notes did not match what I had copied a few years ago. Was it possible I had made a mistake in my entry?

Inspector-160143_640


One discrepancy, which leapt off the page, was that the index showed a total of four people in Edward's household - including free whites, slaves and free colored. But my notes showed that I had more than four people in Edward's household consisting of slaves and free colored.

Here is what I had written in my earlier notes:

Slaves:
1 female 56-100
1 female 24-36
Free Colored:
1 female 56-100
1 female 26-56
1 female 24-36

Not only did I have nine people total (instead of Ancestry's four) I also has five slaves and free colored while Ancestry had zero.

I knew I needed to check the online image to clear up the discrepancy. Edward was listed on line 21 of the image page and sure enough there were only four people shown as living in his household. But a check of the column headings top of the image page revealed that I was only viewing the section on White Males and Females! There were no column headings for Slaves or Free Colored.

Clicking on the right facing arrow took me to the second page and sure enough there were the headings for Slaves and Free Colored. I was feeling pretty smug because I saw that indeed there were vertical marks in the columns I'd previously noted. I figured Ancestry.com had omitted indexing that second page and they were in error, not me.

Then I checked for my third great grandfather Levi Peer. I'd noted previously that he owned one male slave but that didn't show up in Ancestry's indexed entry. Checking the image and going to the second page showed that there was indeed a mark in the column Slaves of 100 and upwards. That seemed odd. Who would own a slave that was over 100 years old??!!

And why hadn't that fact jumped out at me the first time I saw it? Warning bells were going off so I took a closer look at that second page. And that's when I noticed that the vertical marks were slanting backwards instead of forward as they were on the page with individual's names.

And other individuals on the census page also had marks in that column labelled Slaves of 100 and upwards. There was no way all those people owned slaves over 100 years old! Something was definitely wrong but I didn't figure it out until I looked closely at the total numbers in each column on page 2. The numbers were backwards. It was a slap my forehead in disbelief moment. I was looking at bleed-through from the next page! The strokes I saw in each column on page 2 had nothing to do with the people on the previous page.

So all these years I was wrong. My ancestor Levi Peer did not own slaves in 1830 in Pennsylvania. I was very happy to learn this but why oh why had I not been more careful when I first saw this record? I pride myself on being detail-oriented and cautious but I goofed that time (and probably other times!)

So remember that it pays to go back and scrutinize your older research. You never know what clue you might have missed or even where you may have erred in interpreting the data.  I'm so happy I decided to review those 1830 census records for my ancestors in Pennsylvania.

Now I'm off to review my findings for 1820!

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.

 


Another brick wall solved

Another Brick Wall Solved-2


Wooohooo! Another brick wall mystery solved!

When I heard how it was solved, it made me feel that everything we're doing here with our Legacy software and our webinar series is worth all the time and effort we put into it. And when I read of the excitement from someone who has just solved a genealogical puzzle, it lifts my spirits and gives me renewed hope for my lost ancestors. So, congrats to Susan Biddle, and with her permission, I have republished her comments that she wrote in our Legacy User Group on Facebook below.

Here's her initial comments:

Fb1

She totally left us all hanging, didn't she? ;) What tips, what webinars, and how did she do it? So after a bunch of "likes" and people asking her how she did it, she filled us in:

Fb2

Once again, congrats to Susan! And Beth Foulk deserves kudos for her Problem Solving with FANs webinar. And let's give some extra kudos to Elizabeth Shown Mills for inventing the FAN concept (Friends, Associates, Neighbors). And for whoever it was that gave the newspaper tips, well done!


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by James M. Beidler

Register

While there’s a galaxy of Internet sites that can help you with your German genealogy, some stars shine brighter than others – and it’s not just Ancestry and FamilySearch, although those two 500-pound canaries both have huge assets for those seeking Deutsch ancestors.

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Join us and James M. Beidler for the live webinar Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

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In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

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No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

JamesBeidler-144x144James M. Beidler is the author of The Family Tree German Genealogy Book, Trace Your German Roots Online, as well as writes Roots & Branches, an award-winning weekly newspaper column on genealogy that is the only syndicated feature on that topic in Pennsylvania. He is also a columnist for German Life magazine and is editor of Der Kurier, the quarterly journal of the Mid-Atlantic Germanic Society.

He was the President of the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors from 2010 to 2012, and is the former Executive Director for the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania. He served as national co-chairman for the 2008 Federation of Genealogical Societies conference in Philadelphia.

Beidler is also frequent contributor to other periodicals ranging from scholarly journals such as The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine to popular-interest magazines such as Ancestry Magazine and Family Tree Magazine. He also wrote the chapter on genealogy for Pennsylvania: A History of the Commonwealth, published jointly by the Penn State Press and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

As a lecturer, he was a part of the Pennsylvania Humanities Council’s acclaimed Commonwealth Speakers program from 2002 to 2009, and has been a presenter at numerous conferences. In addition to being a member of numerous genealogical, historical, and lineage societies, Beidler also sits on Pennsylvania’s State Historic Records Advisory Board as well as the selection committee for the Pennsylvania Digital Newspaper Project.

He is a Senior Tax Advisor for an H&R Block franchise and previously was a copy editor for 15 years for The Patriot-News newspaper in Harrisburg, PA.

Beidler was born in Reading, PA, and raised in nearby Berks County, where he currently resides and is an eighth-generation member of Bern Reformed United Church of Christ. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Hofstra University in Long Island, NY, with a BA in Political Science in 1982.

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Is It A Match? Ways to Correlate Evidence and Identify Ancestors

Is it a Match

Throughout my journey as a genealogist, I have learned the importance of exercising caution. Using caution means not publishing information about the identities of families and individuals unless we are confident that this person matches the profile we have gathered through previous research and have eliminated other theories about who this person could be. There is always a great temptation to do the genealogy happy dance at the moment of discovery, but in most cases, a match should remain tentative until the evidence shows beyond a reasonable doubt that a match has been made and can be added to our family tree.

The facts that our most often correlated or matched in genealogical research consist of three categories: names, dates, and locations. A fourth category could be reserved for other details such as occupations and other anecdotes about that person passed down through the generations. Collectively, these sets of facts are what we use to compare to other sources to determine if we have made a match.

Tools for organizing and analyzing research

Timelines are an excellent tool for analyzing sources and the genealogical profile of an individual. Most family tree programs, such as Legacy, offer a timeline feature. You can also start a table in a word processor or spreadsheet program for entering your data. Timelines can be utilized for comparison and correlating information, evidence, and sources. In two individuals with a the same name, a timeline can be utilized to demonstrate the separate identities of individuals or on the flip side, to demonstrate that the two seemingly different people are in fact the same.

It may also be useful to create a table comparing sources, which provide information on the same fact, such as the year of birth. Ancestors, their informants, or the authors of published works may give different answers as to where and when such events occurred. Putting together a table that compares sources and information allows researchers to notice possible outliers or less reliable sources, because they came from an informant many years after the event occurred and are thus more susceptible to error.

Accessing the full record

Many records are online, but many of them provide partial information compared to what’s available. The index only serves as an abstract of the full record, such as index volumes for vital records, which provide the name, date and location of the event, with the volume and page reference to the original records. Our intuition can certainly lead us to the idea that this could be a match, but we need to pull the original record to get confirmation. The original birth record or entry in the register will usually include more details, like the occupation of the father, the mother’s maiden name, address, and specifics we need so a full comparison can be completed with the facts that have been collected.

Utilizing Negative Evidence and Similarities to Merge Identities

Negative evidence is essentially the absence of a particular name or individual in a source. It’s useful because when researchers are to be confident of their matches, it helps to prove this person isn’t being mistaken for someone else. For example, in order to prove that my great-grandfather’s brother Arthur Edward Fleischhauer was the same person as Arthur Edward Allen, I had to demonstrate the similarities in their genealogical profile, but also prove that this couldn’t be mistaken for someone else.

Arthur Edward Fleischhauer was born 25 Mar 1900 to German emigrants Franz and Meta (Rankin) Fleischhauer in Brooklyn, New York.[1] He enlisted in the Marine Corps during WWI and lived with the Fleischhauer family according the 1900 and 1920 US Federal Census.[2] Arthur left the Fleischhauer family in the 1920s and by the 1930 Census is living as Arthur Allen and married to his wife Dorothy de Blois Bogart. Of the available in the 1930 Census, the three pieces of evidence that indicated a match was that his age in the census would have made his birth date 1900, both parents were born in Germany, and he was a veteran of WWI.[3]

I had to search all the census schedules between 1900-1940 to locate any other men named Arthur Allen that could fit the profile and then locate their records to see if they have correct the date. The gravestone of Col. Arthur Edward Allen states he was born 25 Mar 1900, but no Arthur Edward Allen is born 25 Mar 1900 in New York according to the birth indexes and no men of this name enlisted in World War I according to draft registration cards.[4] This is a short example for demonstration purposes that negative evidence, along with the correlation of similarities, helps to build an argument proving that two individuals are one in the same.

How close of a match does it have to be?

The problem is that in genealogy, we are not always handed a 100% match, there are discrepancies concerning a person's facts in the sources we collect. Sometimes there are larger discrepancies, such as of three major pieces of information in a genealogical profile: names, dates, and location. Individuals may have used a certain alias or alternated one of their given names as their first name. Dates are even shakier because our ancestors may not correctly remember the birth date. They may also enact leniency on their true age, so they state they are younger than they actually are. Of these, the one part of our ancestor’s profile that is the most important is the location. Our ancestors could not clone themselves, so while they could change the facts about their life to assume a new identity, it’s very hard to discredit evidence concerning location. One could argue this if their ancestor appears in the same census schedule twice, which happens rarely, but in nearly every instance, our ancestor had to be in one place.

The more these techniques are put into practice, the more it becomes a part of the researcher’s intuition. It is a great exercise in analytical skills to survey and correlate all of the facts, thus training the mind to look for these clues and better understand these sources. Furthermore, being cautious and keeping our matches tentative until proven better serves the genealogical community, because when we put this information online, we know it’s going to be copied and pasted and thus spread like wildfire.

 

[1] “New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909,” database, FamilySearch, entry for Arthur E. Fleischhauer, 25 Mar 1900.

[2] “U.S. Marine Corps Muster Rolls, 1798-1940,” database, Ancestry; Brooklyn, Kings, New York, 1900 US Federal Census, roll 1067, ED 517, 10A, household of Frank Fleischauer; Assembly Dist. 4, Queens County, New York, 1920 US Federal Census roll 1234, ED 322, p 21B, household of Frank E. Fleischauer.

[3] Kew Garden, Queens County, New York, 1930 US Federal Census, roll 1609, ED 41-568, page 9A.

[4] Data Entry and Photo of Arthur Edward Allen, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, Findagrave.com, memorial no. 48998977.

---

Jake Fletcher is a genealogist and blogger. Jake has been researching and writing about genealogy since 2008 on his research blog Travelogues of a Genealogist. He currently volunteers as a research assistant at the National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts and is Vice President of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists (NEAPG).


Messages from the Grave: Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone - free webinar by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL now online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "Messages from the Grave: Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone" by Elissa Scalise Powell is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Webinar Description

In order to find an ancestor's tombstone, the burial ground must first be found. Tips are given on how to find the different cemeteries depending on the time period, type (church or commercial), and economic condition of the deceased. Tombstones are the last monuments to our lives on this earth. In their shape and inscribed symbols, they can speak of the lifestyle of the deceased or the attitude of death of the loved ones left behind. They are being destroyed by many factors, which make them illegible or eradicate them altogether. Abandoned and "lost" cemeteries can be found through records and natural signs. Discussion includes ways to read "illegible" stones, which may be the last time a person may hear the tombstone "speak." This webinar illustrates these techniques and shows what problems are encountered in reading a variety of markers and what might be done to overcome them. Internet sources and resources are also discussed throughout the lecture.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 48 minute recording of "Messages from the Grave: Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - tombstone - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, May 16, 2016

Cemetery ResearchLegacy QuickGuide: Cemetery Research 2.95

The Cemetery Research Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including tips and tricks, a list of different types of cemeteries, terminology, and more. This handy 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

For the genealogy researcher, cemeteries are considered “museums” providing a link with the past which reflect the culture, history, art, architecture and attitudes of an ancestor’s era. Data found through cemetery visits, as well as through online and/or offline cemetery research, may unearth clues about an ancestor and about the time and place where an ancestor lived.

Click here to purchase for 2.95.

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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Dirty Pictures: Save Your Family Photos from Ruin - free webinar by Denise Levenick now online for limited time

2016-05-11-image500-blog

The recording of Wednesday's webinar, "Dirty Pictures: Save Your Family Photos from Ruin" by Denise May Levenick is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Webinar Description

Dirty negatives, smudged old photos, curled panorama pictures, and photos stuck in sticky albums. Learn how to rescue your family photos, albums, and scrapbooks from the ravages of time.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 28 minute recording of "Dirty Pictures: Save Your Family Photos from Ruin"  is now available to view in our webinar library for free. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - picture - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, May 16, 2016


BookHow to Archive Family Keepsakes by Denise May Levenick - 18.95

In every family someone ends up with Mom's and Dad's "stuff"—a lifetime's worth of old family photos, papers, and memorabilia packed into boxes, trunks, and suitcases. This inheritance can be as much a burden as it is a blessing. How do you organize your loved one's estate in a way that honors your loved one, keeps the peace in your family and doesn't take over your home or life? How to Archive Family Keepsakes gives you step-by-step advice for how to organize, distribute and preserve family heirlooms.

You'll learn how to:
  • Organize the boxes of your parents' stuff that you inherited
  • Decide which family heirlooms to keep
  • Donate items to museums, societies, and charities
  • Protect and pass on keepsakes
  • Create a catalog of family heirlooms
  • Organize genealogy files and paperwork
  • Digitize family history records
  • Organize computer files to improve your research
Whether you have boxes filled with treasures or are helping a parent or relative downsize to a smaller home, this book will help you organize your family archive and preserve your family history for future generations.

Published 2012, Paperback: 208 pages, 6" x 9"

Click here to purchase.

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Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 344 classes, 496 hours of genealogy education)
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  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Friday - Messages from the Grave: Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL

Register

In order to find an ancestor's tombstone, the burial ground must first be found. Tips are given on how to find the different cemeteries depending on the time period, type (church or commercial), and economic condition of the deceased. Tombstones are the last monuments to our lives on this earth. In their shape and inscribed symbols, they can speak of the lifestyle of the deceased or the attitude of death of the loved ones left behind. They are being destroyed by many factors, which make them illegible or eradicate them altogether. Abandoned and "lost" cemeteries can be found through records and natural signs. Discussion includes ways to read "illegible" stones, which may be the last time a person may hear the tombstone "speak." This webinar illustrates these techniques and shows what problems are encountered in reading a variety of markers and what might be done to overcome them. Internet sources and resources are also discussed throughout the lecture.

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Join us and Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL for the live webinar Friday, May 13, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

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Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

ElissaPowell-144x144Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, a western Pennsylvania researcher for over 25 years, is the co-director of the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP), and Professional Genealogy Course Coordinator at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR) at Samford University. She is an instructor for Boston University's Genealogical Research Certificate online program. She was the course co-coordinator of the AG/CG Preparation Course at the 2010 and 2013 Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG). She is a regional and national speaker on such topics as Pennsylvania records, methodology, professional development, and society management.

She was honored in May 2010 with the NGS President's Citation in recognition of outstanding, continuing, or unusual contributions to the field of genealogy. She was a Director for the Association of Professional Genealogists for six years; taught genealogy courses at the local community college for fourteen years; co-edited a cemetery book series and appeared on the PBS-TV show ANCESTORS2 cemetery episode. She was a Trustee for the Board for Certification of Genealogists for nine years, their President (2012-2014), and past Outreach Committee Chairperson. She is a past-President of two local Pittsburgh area societies and a contributing author to many publications including the APG Quarterly.

An NSDAR member, she is also a lifetime member of the Ohio Genealogical Society; the Medina County Chapter, OGS; and the Baltzer Meyer Historical Society (Greensburg, PA) which was named for her ancestor.

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With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Friday, May 13, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Ephemera: Genealogy Gold - new BONUS webinar by Sharon S. Atkins now available

Discover the wonderful world of ephemera (records designed for short term use - such as diaries, postcards, letters and newspaper articles) for genealogy research. In this BONUS webinar, learn how these records enhance our understanding of ancestors in the context of time and place.

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research! This new class is a bonus webinar in the webinar library. The webinar previews are always free.

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Ephemeral-Gen GoldLegacy QuickGuide - Ephemera: Genealogy Gold - 2.95

Sharon is also the author of the Legacy QuickGuide, Ephemera: Genealogy Gold

Valuable clues about an ancestor’s life are often found by locating different forms of ephemera as well as researching various categories of ephemera. Ephemera can provide a glimpse into the world of your ancestor; whether you find an old postcard, a newspaper article, a graduation program, or something as wonderful as a diary, you can instantly be transported back in time and place to experience your ancestor’s life.
 
The Ephemera: Genealogy Gold Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including tips and tricks, a list of different types of ephemera, terminology, and more. This handy 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 
 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 345 classes in the library (497 hours of quality genealogy education)
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  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

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Subscribe

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2016! All live webinars are free to watch.

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Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.