3 New Rhode Island Bonus Webinars by Diane Boumenot

3 New Rhode Island Bonus Webinars by Diane Boumenot

Your Rhode Island ancestors are waiting to be discovered! In this series, Diane Boumenot shares her secrets for finding Rhode Island roots. You'll learn about the best genealogy destinations in Rhode Island, researching your 19th century ancestors and five methods for bringing down your brick walls. Add them to your Legacy playlist today!

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research! These new classes are bonus webinars for the webinar library. The webinar previews are always free.

Top Genealogy Destinations in Rhode Island

Given Rhode Island's unique and fascinating history, it's no surprise that today's repositories of records and artifacts are quite varied. Learn about the best sites for various record types, and how to navigate the sources of your family's story in person, near the beaches and seafood of Rhode Island.

Top Genealogy Destinations in Rhode Island

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From Farms to Mills: 19th Century Rhode Island Ancestors

Follow the journey of Rhode Islanders that did not head west and the lives of newly arrived Americans. What unique kinds of records were produced as the state watched its small farming communities become growing industrial centers? 

From Farms to Mills: 19th Century Rhode Island Ancestors

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Five Methods for Solving Your Rhode Island Brick Walls

What methods and best practices might work well for YOUR Rhode Island brick wall ancestor? Five stories of breaking through brick walls will help you find new strategies for your own research.  

Five Methods for Solving Your Rhode Island Brick Walls

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About the Presenter

Diane Boumenot on Legacy Family Tree Webinars
Diane MacLean Boumenot specializes in southern New England genealogy research, including work on her own ancestors, who were among the original settlers of Massachusetts and Rhode Island and never ventured farther west than Connecticut. She publishes her genealogy adventures on her website, One Rhode Island Family, which also contains helpful links to Rhode Island's digital record sets. She enjoys speaking about research strategies. Additionally, Diane has a long career in association management and believes strongly in the powerful combination of organizations and members pursuing their passion. A graduate of Wesleyan University with a degree in American History and English, Diane is a member of ProGen 28.

Also by Diane Boumenot:
 
Finding Your Colonial Rhode Island Ancestors


Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 574 classes in the library (783 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 2,643 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2017! All live webinars are free to watch.

2017speakers

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.


New Legacy QuickGuide now available: Using Archives to Fill the Gaps in your Ancestor's Timeline

Legacy QuickGuidesTM have quickly become one of the more popular resources for genealogists. Each guide contains four (sometimes five, sometimes more) pages of valuable information covering a variety of genealogy research topics, dozens of clickable links, and are written by genealogists and family historians who are experts in the subject areas. We've added another new Legacy QuickGuide: Using Archives to Fill the Gaps in Your Ancestor's Timeline by Melissa Barker. Now choose from 90 Legacy QuickGuides!

Using Archives to Fill the Gaps in Your Ancestor's Timeline Using Archives to Fill Gaps - 2.95  

Genealogists are always looking for more information about their ancestors. For many genealogists, only having the birth, marriage and death dates is just not enough to tell an ancestor’s story. Ancestor timelines have many gaps of missing information and finding the records needed to fill in those gaps is what this guide is all about.

The Using Archives to Fill the Gaps in Your Ancestor's Timeline Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including how to use timelines to determine gaps in your research. Also included are links to websites and resources covering the best record sets found at an archive or repository for filling in gaps and more. This handy 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 
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Now choose from 90!

Purchase for just $2.95

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United States - State Guides

United States - other Guides

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FREE DOWNLOAD: Disaster Planning for the Genealogist

Thanks to Thomas MacEntee and Melissa Barker for this article and offer:

Disaster planning for genealogy

Given this past week’s events in Texas related to Hurricane Harvey, and as the storm makes its way through the American South this weekend, it is easy to feel helpless if you and your family are not directly impacted. In speaking with genealogy friends and colleagues, I don’t think there is any degree of separation from this disaster: we likely all know at least one person who has lost their home, their business and their possessions.

Besides contributing to various charities, gathering relief supplies and volunteering, here is something you can do for yourself: put together a disaster plan related to your genealogy and family history research.

Disaster planning guideDownload this FREE GUIDE on Disaster Planning by Melissa Barker
Melissa Barker, aka The Archive Lady, knows all too well what can happen to important papers and artifacts as well as data when a disaster hits. Whether it is fire, flood or simply a computer failure, Melissa has created a guide at Legacy Family Tree entitled Disaster Planning for the Genealogist.

Through a special arrangement with our friends at Legacy Family Tree, Melissa wants to make sure that every genealogist has access to this important information. That is why Disaster Planning for the Genealogist is available as a FREE DOWNLOAD starting Thursday, August 31st through Sunday, September 3rd, 2017. Click HERE to get your PDF copy now!

Please take a minute not to just download the guide, but please read it and seriously consider what would happen if you lost treasured family heirlooms or research data related to your genealogy. You can at least minimize damage from various disasters, if not prevent such damage all together.

So this weekend as you keep others in Texas in your thoughts and prayers, take a minute to do your homework and put together a disaster plan for your genealogy.


Getting Started with Evidentia - free webinar by Ed Thompson now online

2017-08-30-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Getting Started with Evidentia" by Ed Thompson is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free.

Webinar Description

A quick overview of using Evidentia software to organize and share your research with Legacy Family Tree software. We will cover entering and cataloging your first source, analyzing your evidence, and exporting that evidence for use in Legacy Family Tree.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 30 minute recording of "Getting Started with Evidentia" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 570 classes, 778 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,624 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (currently 50% off until August 20, 2017)
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


New Bonus Webinar - Facial Recognition Tools for the Genealogist by Maureen Taylor

New Bonus Webinar - Facial Recognition Tools for the Genealogist by Maureen Taylor

Have you ever wanted to compare two photos who you think are the same person? Maybe one photo was taken in early adulthood and the other late in life. Determining for sure who is in a photo can be tricky. In this webinar Maureen Taylor takes you on a tour of facial recognition tools that can help identify your ancestors.

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research! This new class is a bonus webinar for the webinar library. The webinar previews are always free.

Facial Recognition Tools for the Genealogist

Television crime shows make facial recognition software look flawless. In fact, it’s less than perfect. This lecture explores the myths and realities of facial recognition software including how it works and when it works best. Paying attention to facial details is just one step in determining if you have two photos of the same person. It’s about paying attention to the evidence in the picture and the clues in your family history too.  

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About the Presenter

Maureen Taylor The Photo Detective
Maureen Taylor is an internationally recognized expert on the intersection of history, genealogy, and photography. She has been featured in top media outlets, including The View, Better Homes & Gardens, the Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, MSNBC, DIY: Scrapbooking, PBS Ancestors, Creative Memories' Lasting Moments, Dear Myrtle, and Satisfaction Magazine. Maureen is the author of a number of books and magazine articles, as well as a contributing editor at Family Tree Magazine. The Wall Street Journal calls Maureen "the nation's foremost historical photo detective." Before she was the Photo Detective, Maureen was known for her expertise researching families in her home state of Rhode Island.

Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 570 classes in the library (778 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 2,627 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2017! All live webinars are free to watch.

2017speakers

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

 


Tuesday’s Tip – Swapping Events (Intermediate)

  Tuesday's Tip - Swapping events (Intermediate)
Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Swapping Events (Intermediate)

Many users don't know about this very handy tool. You can swap an alternate name for the birth name and you can swap any custom event you have entered for a vital event.

Let's say I discover that an alternate spelling of a person's name is actually the correct spelling. I can swap the two names and the sources for those names will also swap. Another reason you might swap is if you are dealing with someone that has legally changed their name or it is an adoption situation. You always want to record the name as it was at the time of the birth but you might want the name they actually use to print in a report. You can temporarily swap the names for the report and then swap them back.

Swapping alternate names
(Click image to enlarge)

 

If I have entered conflicting or alternate vital event information as a custom event, and then learn that this information is actually correct, I can swap the two events instead of having to retype everything and then reattaching the sources.

Swapping a custom event with a vital event
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This is a time saving feature that I have used many times.

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News.  You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

Certified Genealogist is a registered trademark and the designation CG is a service mark of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by Board certificants who meet competency standards.

 


3 Ways to Get Records from Foreign Archives

3 Ways to Get Records from Foreign Archives

Genealogy research in Central and Eastern Europe has come a long way in the past decade. It used to be that locating a church or civil registration record required much effort and long waiting times. Your options for accessing records were: 1) traveling to perform onsite research in archives, 2) spending a fortune to hire a professional to do the research for you, 3) writing a letter and hoping the registrar’s office or priest would understand and answer your questions or 4) hoping records for your ancestral village were included among those microfilmed by The Genealogical Society of Utah and made available through the Family History Library.

Today, the landscape for researchers has changed, and there are more options for tracking down grandma’s baptismal document or great-grandpa’s Austrian military service record.  Here are three ways to get the records you need from foreign archives.

  1. Start with FamilySearch. FamilySearch.org has a growing collection of church and civil registration records from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, and other localities. First, check out the Digital Collections. From the FamilySearch home page, click the magnifying glass labeled Search, then click “Browse All Published Collections.” Choose Continental Europe and scroll to find the country you’re searching for (e.g., Slovakia). You can also type an ancestor’s name in the search boxes on the left-hand side, click on a map for a location, or if you know the name of the specific collection, start typing the first few letters of the name in the Collection title box; matching choices (such as Slovak, Church and Synagogue Books, 1592–1910) will pop up underneath.

    Be sure to read the directions! When you get to the collection’s page, read the description carefully to understand what exactly is included. Click the “Learn More” button to access related FamilySearch Wiki articles on a particular collection or topic. Make sure you sign up for a free FamilySearch account and follow the FamilySearch Blog or subscribe to the FamilySearch newsletter to receive notifications whenever the collections are added or updated.

    In addition, you will want to check the FamilySearch Catalog for microfilms you can view if you plan a visit to the Family History Library, or you can hire a researcher to view them on your behalf (Starting September 1, 2017, FamilySearch will discontinue its microfilm distribution services, which mean you will no longer have the option to order and view films at a Family History Center. Read more about it on the FamilySearch Blog). Start with a Place search to see if there are any church or civil registration records available. Although most localities will turn up this way, not all villages or towns had a church or synagogue for each religion. Often residents would need to travel to the nearest neighboring village. Once you find the location, click to see the microfilm catalog title, and you will be able to determine if the content is digitized and available. On the catalog title, under Format and next to the microfilm number, you will find a magnifying glass icon (indicating the microfilm is at least partially indexed), a camera icon (indicating the microfilm is digitized), and a film icon (indicating you will need to order the film). You can also search the catalog by keyword, subject, or film number (if known).

   FHL-Film-Note

Fenscakcropped
 This cropped muster roll page from the Varannó military district of Hungary, now Vranov, Czechoslovakia,  shows the 1873 entry (second row) for Mihály Fencsák, from Póssa, Slovakia.  Details include parents’ first names, height and chest size, religion, and “weak returned” as the decision of the committee for induction or transfer. The image can be browsed online at FamilySearch.org.

 

  1. Archival Websites. A number of archives have put some of their records online. The Czech Republic, Poland, Estonia, and Latvia, for example.  You can use the FamilySearch Wiki for each country and click the blue "Online Records" button to see a table with a list of online records. You can also use Google, or another search engine to search for an archive, or consult websites for ethnic genealogical societies such as the Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International, the Polish Genealogical Society International, East European Genealogical Society, or the Foundation for East European Family History Studies. Once you locate an archival portal, check for an English interface (look for the word “English” or the American flag symbol), and look first for any finding aids or help sections. Some sites require you to set up a free account.
  1. Commercial Websites and Other Online Portals.  Those researching in Western European countries often find good coverage of church and civil registration records on subscription sites such as Findmypast.com or Ancestry.com, as well as other dedicated websites. However, those with Central and Eastern European roots often have to look a bit harder to find these records, but online collections do exist. For example, the JewishGen website has a large collection of databases and resources including the Jewish Records Indexing Poland project, and several Eastern European Special Interest Groups. Those with Czech Roots will want to explore Portafontium. For Polish researchers, the Poznan Projectand Geneteka are good resources. Facebook groups can also be helpful (groups exist for many ethnicities).

Finally, remember that not all records are online—and some areas are not yet included—so in many instances, you’ll still need to consult the FamilySearch Catalog for microfilmed records, contact churches or archives, or consult with a researcher based in that country for hard-to-get records and translation assistance. Professional firms can give you a quote. You can also check with an ethnic genealogical society, or ask for recommendations on social media. But the good news is that getting copies of your ancestor’s records from foreign archives and repositories is not as difficult as it once was 10 or 15 years ago, and more records are being digitized and indexed all the time. You should make it a habit to periodically check FamilySearch, archival sites and other sources for new and updated content.

For more tips on researching your Eastern European Ancestors watch these webinars in the Legacy library.

Lisa A. Alzo, M.F.A. is a freelance writer, instructor and internationally recognized lecturer specializing in Eastern European genealogy, writing your family history, and finding female and immigrant ancestors.  She is the author of 10 books, including The Family Tree Polish, Czech and Slovak Genealogy Guide, and the award-winning Three Slovak Women.  Lisa is a frequent speaker for Legacy Family Tree Webinars, and blogs at The Accidental Genealogist. She can be reached at http://www.lisaalzo.com.

 


Register for Webinar Wednesday: Getting Started with Evidentia software by Edward A. Thompson

Register

A quick overview of using Evidentia software to organize and share your research with Legacy Family Tree software. We will cover entering and cataloging your first source, analyzing your evidence, and exporting that evidence for use in Legacy Family Tree.

Join us and Edward A. Thompson for the live webinar Wednesday, August 30, 2017 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here.  

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

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Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

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Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

EdwardThompson-144x144Edward A. Thompson graduated from the University of Florida in March of 1981 with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. In May of 1984 he graduated from Emory University as a Master of Theology, and started his first career as a Methodist Minister in Florida. In June of 2008 he completed a second Master’s in Computer Information Systems from Nova Southeastern University’s online Master’s program. In March of 1988 Edward started work at Delta Airlines, where he was taught mainframe programming from scratch, and discovered that he had a knack for programming. Since then he has been a Software Engineer and Senior Architect for Delta, MasterCard, Premier (a health care company), Wachovia Securities, and now Captech Ventures. He currently enjoys working as a contractor in the software development field. He loves to read, enjoys woodworking, and as an offering at the altar of geekdom, he also programs for fun. Most of his time is spent enhancing Evidentia and interacting with the online genealogy community.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, August 30, 2017 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


The Revolutionary War with Craig Scott, CG - Summer Spectacular Series Now Available

  The Revolutionary War with Craig Scott, CG - Summer Spectacular Series Now Available

Discover your Revolutionary War ancestors with help from military expert Craig Scott, CG. In this series Craig helps you navigate the extensive records created to document Revolutionary War soldiers. You'll learn how to track specifics related to your ancestor, their family, their service records, pension records, bounty land and more!

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research!

All five of these new classes are bonus classes in the webinar library. They continue the Summer Spectacular webinar series just for members. The webinar previews are always free for non-members to watch.

New to webinars and online education? Learn more about the online genealogy education classes at Legacy Family Tree Webinars.

Revolutionary War Series 1 of 5: The Revolution: More than just the War

Places the research in context from the period of the French and Indian War, up to the Revolutionary War. Discusses the research strategy for successful research from literature review through free and subscription websites relating to the War.

Revolutionary War Series 1 of 5: The Revolution: More than just the War

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Revolutionary War Series 2 of 5: The Participants in the War

Places the researcher in a position to understand the various kinds of military organizations in the war and the places where records relating to these organizations can be found. Identifies the differences between Continental and militia service.

Revolutionary War Series 2 of 5: The Participants in the War

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Revolutionary War Series 3 of 5: Records Created by the Revolutionary War During the War

Describes the kinds of records that were created by the war and how they have been transformed into other records today. Discusses free and subscription databases, as well as the availability of textual records concerning individuals in the w​ar.

Revolutionary War Series 3 of 5: Records Created by the Revolutionary War During the War

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Revolutionary War Series 4 of 5: Records Created by the Revolutionary War After the War - Pensions

Describes pension law, pension application files, pension ledgers, pension payment vouchers, last and final payments. Examine lineage societies and the material that is available for research.

Revolutionary War Series 4 of 5: Records Created by the Revolutionary War After the War - Pensions

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Revolutionary War Series 5 of 5: Records Created by the Revolutionary War After the War: Bounty Land 

Describes the history of state and federal bounty land, French and Indian War bounty land during the Revolutionary War, bounty land acts, and the bounty land process. Examines the information to be found in Bureau of Land Management website relating to military bounty land.

Revolutionary War Series 5 of 5: Records Created by the Revolutionary War After the War: Bounty Land 

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Another Webinar by Craig Scott, CG

Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 564 classes in the library (777 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 2,624 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2017! All live webinars are free to watch.

2017speakers

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

 

 

 

6-RevWar-SubscriberSpectacular-bigtext


Ask Legacy: how do I invite others to work on my tree?

TeamworkI received this email from Alexandra today with this great question:

Several cousins and I have been working on our genealogy for the past several years.  Two cousins are using Ancestry.com software but the limitation is only one person can input data.
 
We are looking for a program where say around 4 or 5 of us could input data and all have access to the program.  Does your program have this capability?
 
Great question Alexandra! Yes, Legacy Family Tree software is set up to allow a group to work together on the same tree. Below are a few methods of doing this.
 
IntelliShare
Using this first method, you need to pick one person to be the "master keeper of the files." This person first creates a new Legacy family file (or uses their existing one) and then shares it with each member of your research group (create a backup of your family file, email it to the others, and have them restore the backup into their copy of Legacy).
 
Each person in the group works on their part of the family tree, updating or adding new data. At an agreed upon time, everyone sends their Legacy file back to the master keeper who then imports the files into the master copy. Using Legacy's IntelliShare tool (found at Tools > Merge Duplicates > Find Duplicates > Special Duplicate Searches) they merge in all the changes and resolve any discrepancies. With the newly updated master family file, the administrator then sends out a new copy for everyone in their group to work on.
 
For more information on IntelliShare, view the IntelliShare topic in Legacy's help system or view the "Merging and Intellishare" section of the webinar, "Using Legacy Family Tree to Support Family Groups/Associations."
 
Dropbox or network sharing
While I haven't personally used this method, many Legacy users have success when moving their family file to a shared network drive or with the use of Dropbox. Each person in the group would need to have access to the network drive or to the Dropbox folder. The downside of using Dropbox, is only one person can have the file open at a time so you would need to coordinate your efforts. If accessing the family file from a network drive, multiple people can be using the family file at the same time as long as they are not editing the same person at the same time.
 
For more information on how other Legacy users use Dropbox, search the archives in our Legacy User Group on Facebook or view the "Legacy and Dropbox" section of the webinar, "Dropbox for Genealogists."
 
Online Tree
If you want to collaborate in an online environment where nothing needs to be checked in and out, you don't need to be careful about only one person using the file at a time, and everyone in your group can see everyone's changes and additions in real time, you might give MyHeritage a try. A basic site where your entire group can collaborate is free for up to 250 people in the tree, or you can upgrade to an unlimited tree for an annual fee.
 
To get started, visit www.myheritage.com and start your tree. Then, invite others in your family to participate (Home > Invite family). You'll want to ensure that site members have access to edit the tree (Family Tree > Manage Trees > Edit Tree Settings).
 
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In a future Legacy upgrade, both Legacy and MyHeritage will interact together. You'll be able to have your data in one or the other, and also take advantage of each other's strengths.
 
What do I do?
I have my personal tree in my Legacy Family Tree software where nobody else can view it unless they're sitting next to me or I optionally share portions of it with them. I also use Legacy's FamilySearch tool to provide updates to FamilySearch's Family Tree so others can benefit from my work. I also manually add new findings to various online trees so I can take advantage of all of the hinting resources out there. Finally, I always have an updated copy of my tree at MyHeritage so I can take advantage of their free mobile app and have my tree with me anywhere I go. I also make a backup of my Legacy family file: I use its backup tool to backup to my hard drive, to my Dropbox folder, and to my Legacy Cloud account.
 
So, this answer may have been a little longer than you hoped for Alexandra, but I hope it's given you a few ideas. And remember, life is short, do genealogy first!