FamilySearch Records Update: New Records for Colombia, France, Peru, Philippines, and United States

Fun FamilySearch additions to the Colombia, FrancePeru, and Philippines international collections this week including significant digital images for Colombia Catholic Church Records from 1600 to 2012. Significant additions were also made to the Texas and Wisconsin marriage collections.  Over 7 million searchable records have been added this week. Follow the links below to explore the new content!

COLLECTION

INDEXED RECORDS

DIGITAL RECORDS

COMMENTS

Colombia Catholic Church Records 1600-2012

0

1,002,173

Added images to an existing collection

France Finistère Quimper et Léon Diocese Catholic Parish Records 1772-1863

144,443

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Illinois Adams County Card Index to Deaths 1877-1990

95,523

96,875

Added indexed records and images collection

Peru Lima Civil Registration 1874-1996

862,440

304

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Philippines Manila Civil Registration 1899-1984

0

4,088,394

Added images to an existing collection

Philippines Pangasinan Civil Registration 1945-1981

84,935

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Texas County Marriage Records 1837-1977

586,960

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Census 1890

15

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Obituaries American Historical Society of Germans from Russia 1899-2012

0

4,154

Added images to an existing collection

Wisconsin County Marriages 1836-1911

213,905

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online

Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.
 
About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors - free webinar by Mark Lowe now available for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors" by Mark Lowe PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for a limited time.

Mark Lowe will teach you about:

  • Learn about the records that transcend the development of Kentucky county, Virginia to the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1792.
  • Learn about the earliest counties, what to use and how to find the right records for your Kentucky ancestors.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 52 minute recording of "Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - kentucky - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, August 24, 2015.

Kentucky GenealogyLegacy QuickGuide: Kentucky Genealogy 2.95

Looking to find those elusive Bluegrass State ancestors? The Kentucky Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including a timeline of Kentucky history events, tips on Kentucky research strategy, outline of major immigrant groups, and more. Also included are links to websites and resources covering vital records, church records, census records, as well as general Kentucky resources. This handy 7 page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

Kentucky derives its name from “Kaintuckee”, which the Cherokee called all land south of the Ohio River. With its tobacco farms and beautiful race horses, Kentucky is divided into three main regions: Western, Central and Eastern Kentucky. Early explorers settled in Eastern Kentucky, a part of Appalachia, coming from Virginia, North and South Carolina. Many of the earliest explorers and settlers were of Scots-Irish descent, a people known for their independent spirits and restless nature, coming from Pennsylvania into the Shenandoah Valley before entering Kentucky territory.

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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Digital Family Reunions by Devin Ashby. August 21.
  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Researching the Musician in Your Family

Genealogical records are useful in understanding a musician’s background.  Consider the case of a well-known American composer and bandleader John Philip Sousa. He was born in Washington DC, 6 Mar 1854 to John Antonio Sousa and Elizabeth Trinkaus. The Sousa family was living in Washington DC in the 1860 Census. Antonio Sousa was head of the household and a 34 year old musician from Spain. Antonio’s wife, Elizabeth, was born in a place called “Hessedat,” confirmed to be a part of Germany.[1] Just one source tells us that Sousa had an upbringing in performing arts and we can even speculate how a culturally diverse background influenced his voice in music. Records also teach us that Antonio was a musician for the United States Marine Corps, adding more understanding John Philip Sousa’s decision to enlist in the marines at the age of fourteen. I hear more often than not that talent runs in the family; a little genealogy detective work can easily solidify one’s story of musical heritage.

Musicians-crop
Eleven musicians posed with their musical instruments, in the Washington, D.C. area, ca 1925.
Courtesy of Library of Congress.


Have you thought about how many different types of genealogy records can be applied to researching ancestors who were musicians? In addition to sources that researchers are most likely familiar with, there are sources specific to this occupation. Music in all of its forms has been integral to the human social experience. The ways in which we can learn about musicians and their relevant history are numerous and unique.

Existing scholarship on the use of genealogy records specific to musicians is rare; therefore, I have outlined an original methodology to guide researchers in learning about musical ancestors.

 

Methodology

 I.  Start with basic biographical research

 If your musical ancestor had gained some notoriety for his talent, he will most likely be found in one of the numerous databases and encyclopedias for artists. Most of the information provided relates to a chronology of their career and achievements. The most genealogically relevant information is given name and vitals. It is important to identify the given name to trace the musician in their early life. Many artists assumed aliases when on stage and in the public eye. For example, if you were trying to research the genealogy of jazz singer Billie Holiday, you would need to know she was born ‘Elinore Harris’ and later changed her name to Eleanor Fagan.[2]

A good collection to check is the American Genealogical Biographical Index (AGBI). The original AGBI is housed at the Godfrey Memorial Library (Middletown, CT) and can also be searched online using Ancestry.com. Online biography websites found through Google should only be supplemental to reliable reference works. A growing musician encyclopedia that is useful and reliable is the Database of Recorded American Music (DRAM). DRAM is a great tool for researching a musician online, and continuously catalogs recorded music, composers, and ensembles.

Check WorldCat for  The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians in the reference section of your local library. This is by the far the best-published reference work for music and related terminology. There will most likely also be smaller collections of biographies related to a particular music genre. Individual biographies provided in county histories (also known as mugbooks or gazetteer) are a good source for local musicians. The Gazetteer for Caledonia and Essex County, Vermont 1764-1887, for example, tells that Judge Ephraim Paddock of St. Johnsbury was a "skillful musician" and appeased many with his talents.[3]

 II.  Search Records that State Occupation

Many different types of records will provide the occupation of the individual. Popular examples would be the Census Records or City Directories. This form of research only works if the ancestor chose to state music as their primary occupation. Even today, some musicians struggle to make full time careers out of their passion and have to perform other occupations. If information from relatives has not been previously exhausted,  it is at this point in the investigation that talking to family members would be useful.

 III.  Newspapers

 Newspapers are an excellent primary source for researching musicians, bands, and music history. For example, the obituary of John Metcalf, published 24 Aug 1810  in Old Colony Gazette (New Bedford, MA) describes him as a fiddler named ‘Blind Jack’ who died near ‘Knaresborough, Eng.’ at the age of 96.[4] You might even be able to find your ancestors because an upcoming concert was plugged in the local newspaper. Their name could be featured in a concert program like this one [See Below]. Check FamilySearch Wiki for Digitized Newspaper Collections and Library of Congress’ Historical Newspaper Directory.

Jazz
Evening star. (Washington, D.C.), 31 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Courtesy of Library of Congress.

 

 IV.  Organizations that Hired Musicians

 Music has been performed throughout history for the enjoyment of people. Many of our local and federal institutions would organize a band or ensemble for the benefit of the local population. Two organizations that come to mind are churches and the military. Researching about musicians in the Armed Forces is possible through genealogy education regarding military service. Those interested in the history of military bands should consult scholarship and further reading:

  • Camus, Raoul F. Military Music of the American Revolution. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1976.
  • Garofalo, Robert, and Mark Elrod. A Pictorial History of Civil War Era Musical Instruments & Military Bands. Charleston, W.Va.: Pictorial Histories Pub. Co., 1985.

V.  Records for Musician Unions

Many universities and historical societies hold the papers of the local musician union. These are unpublished textual records that include member lists, minutes for meetings, and other associated information.  Here are some examples of the finding aids available in university catalogs.

 VI.  Researching Music, Culture, and Folklife

 An ancestor’s musical contribution, large or small, fits in a larger pattern of expression identified mostly through culture. It is important to explore your ancestor’s life in a different way through broader historical context. A country’s archives will usually have some information about the development of their music and folklife. Folklife is a newer term relating to the study of folklore. The study of folk life includes all material culture and oral tradition as inter-related. America’s Library of Congress (LOC) houses a large collection devoted to the history of American Music. Researchers can perform a name or subject search in the Performing Arts Encyclopedia for sound recordings, textual collections, photographs, and more. LOC also houses a growing database called American Memory that contains essays on American Music and Folklife. Scholarship on music from around the world can be found in JSTOR’s database of scholarly articles.

The guide is open to new additions and revisions from other researchers. My own desire to merge the worlds of music and genealogy has led me to consider creating a database for genealogical sketches of musicians. Family historians should feel fortunate if they are able to listen to their ancestors’ recorded performance. It provides a new window into their lives and a more complete view of their humanity.

 

Jake Fletcher is a genealogist and blogger. He received his Bachelor Degree for History in 2013 and is now researching genealogy professionally. Jake has been researching and writing about genealogy  since high school using his blog page Travelogues of a Genealogist.



[1] Antonio Sousa, 1860 United States Census, 6th Ward, Washington, District of Columbia, dwelling no. 666.

 [2] Eleanora Fagan, 1920 US Federal Census, 5th Ward, Baltimore, Maryland, Enumeration Dist. 61, dwelling no. 108.

[3] Hamilton Childs, The Gazetteer for Caledonia and Essex County, Vermont 1764-1887, (Syracuse, NY: The Syracuse Journal Company, 1887), 60.

[4] Obituary for John Metcalf, Old Colony Gazette (New Bedford, MA), 24 Aug 1810, Vol. 2, Issue 45, page 3: accessed at Newsbank, America’s Historical Newspapers (online database).

 


Register for Webinar Friday - Digital Family Reunions with FamilySearch's Devin Ashby

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Want to get together with your friends and family but can’t do it in person? There are many tools that will allow you to get together online and interact together. Come learn about how tools like webinars, Skype, Google+, etc. enable anyone to share and record your conversations.

Join us and FamilySearch's Devin Ashby for the live webinar Friday, August 21, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Registerbut

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On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

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About the presenter

DevinAshby-144x144Devin Ashby is a Community Advocate for FamilySearch, the largest genealogical organization in the world. Devin has been involved in family history for years and in 2004 he received Bachelor degrees in History and Spanish and the following year earned a Masters Degree in Educational Leadership from Northern Arizona University.

View Devin's other webinars here.

Add it to your Google Calendar

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Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Friday, August 21, 2015 at:

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  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


New Book - After You're Gone: Future Proofing Your Genealogy Research by Thomas MacEntee

B_AFTERGON-2TTry as we might, we really have little control over what will happen to our possessions, even our bodies, after we die. Yes, we can draw up legal documents, we can express our wishes to family members and more; however, there are no guarantees when it comes to these matters. The best we can do is prepare, plan and communicate now.
 
When it comes to years of genealogy research and material that you have accumulated, what plans have you made to ensure that this legacy does not die with you? In After You’re Gone: Future Proofing Your Genealogy Research, you will find valuable advice on creating a realistic plan to get your “genealogy affairs” in order. Make sure that the next generation of researchers can benefit from your years of hard work and following your passion.
 
After You’re Gone: Future Proofing Your Genealogy Research covers a wide range of topics including:
  • The Perils of Inaction: Lost Genealogy
  • Action Plan Options
  • Getting Organized
  • Taking Inventory
  • Working with Societies, Libraries and Archives
  • Technology to the Rescue
  • Best Practices for Genealogy Future Proofing

Remember to take action NOW when it comes to making sure your years of genealogy research don’t go to waste.

27 pages | Published 2015 | PDF (download-only) edition

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Purchase for just 3.99 and get immediate download delivery.

Companion Webinar

This new book is the companion to Thomas MacEntee's recent webinar on the topic. Click here to view.

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Register for Webinar Wednesday - Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors by Mark Lowe

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Learn about the records that transcend the development of Kentucky county, Virginia to the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1792. Learn about the earliest counties, what to use and how to find the right records for your Kentucky ancestors.

Join us and J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA for the live webinar Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

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Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Lowemark-144

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA is a full-time professional genealogist, author, and lecturer. While sharing personal experiences that help beginning and experienced researchers gain new skills and insights for research, he specializes in original records and manuscripts throughout the South. Mark lives in Robertson County, Tennessee that lies in northern Middle Tennessee along the Kentucky border. 

Lowe also serves as the Course Coordinator for ‘Research in the South’ at  IGHR (Samford University), for the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG)  and is Director of the Regional In-depth Genealogical Studies Alliance (RIGS Alliance), learning sessions and hands-on research focusing on original documents and manuscripts at regional archives. Mark has worked on several genealogical television series including African American Lives 2Who Do You Think You Are? and UnXplained Events

Mark has published in the Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly (APGQ),National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ), the Genealogical Speakers’ GuildSPEAK!The Longhunter (So. Ky. Genealogical Society), The Middle Tennessee Genealogical Society Quarterly and other local society publications. His own publications include Robertson County Tennessee Marriage Book 2 1859-1873. He formerly was the President of the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG), President for the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS), and Vice President of the Genealogical Speakers Guild (GSG). He is the former President of the Southern Kentucky Genealogical Society. Mark is a Certified Genealogist and a Fellow of the Utah Genealogical Society, and was awarded the Graham T. Smallwood award by the Association of Professional Genealogists.

View Mark's other webinars here.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Census Substitutes for the In-Between Years - new webinar by Amy Johnson Crow now available

New Webinar in the Legacy Library!

Census Substitutes

The Federal census takes a snapshot of life just once a decade.
A lot can happen in the years in between.

The federal census gives us wonderful clues for our research, but the ten years
between each census is a long time. What can be used in between and what are the
strengths and weaknesses of these substitutes?

Amy Johnson Crow will teach you about:

  • Why do we use the census?
  • Some of the types of records you can use as a federal census substitute.
  • Questions to ask when evaluating a census substitute.
  • How to start looking for a census substitute.
  • Periodical Source Index (PERSI)
  • WorldCat

Members Login to Watch Now!

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Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 254 classes in the library (380 hours of quality genealogy education)
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Don’t Let Mythology Guide Your Genealogy Research!

How can you tell if the information posted by individuals on internet genealogy sites is correct? Some sites have sources but others don't. How do you know what, and when, to believe what you read online??

A good rule of thumb is....

Don't trust anything you find on the internet (or elsewhere) if it doesn't have sources.

The Importance of Sources

Without sources you can't verify the information, which means you don't know if it is accurate or if it came from a reliable source. Perhaps it came from Great Aunt Martha. Aunt Martha may have some of it right, but she may have mixed up a lot too. Word of mouth, aka family lore, is often quite wrong or confused but with a shred of truth. Without verification, a researcher has no way of knowing what’s true and what is not.

The information may have come from a book written by someone 100 years ago who didn't have access to sources we have now.

Perhaps the information was transcribed from a book that was transcribed from a microfilm which was in turn transcribed from the original. The chance of human error is greatly increased with each succeeding transcription.

Verify the Information by Checking the Source

Even if a source has been recorded for the information, you should double-check it personally. That means find the original source and verify that what you found was correct. If the information does not have a source, it is up to you, the researcher, to track down where the information came from.

If you write to whomever posted the information online you might be lucky enough to get a source citation from that person. Then you can access the original source and check to see if the information you found is correct. If you cannot get a response to your request for a source, you will have to go on a hunt or look for other records to verify the information you found.

Evaluate the Source

You also want to think about the source itself. Is the source a good one? If Great Aunt Martha gives me information on the birth or baptism of my 3rd great-grandpa and I put it online with the source recorded as "Remembrances of Great Aunt Martha", that's not necessarily a reliable or accurate source. So while it is important to source your findings, you also have to consider how reliable the source is. After all, Great Aunt Martha did have that fall from a horse when she was a child and she IS 97 years old. How accurate is her memory?

However, if I source the birth or baptismal dates with full details on the church where I saw the original record, or the published transcript of those church records, that's much more reliable. There are many good books available on how to write proper source citations, such as “Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, Third Edition” by Elizabeth Shown Mills.

Sources Can Be Misquoted

Sometimes (more often than you might think) sourced information is misquoted or misunderstood. For example on a newsgroup recently someone asked for assistance in figuring out exactly where in Ontario her great-grandfather was born. She provided a quote regarding his being born in a “...fortified town near the border with America” adding that it came from a newspaper article written about him while he was alive.

When I obtained the article I discovered she had misquoted what was actually written. The only reference to his birth stated “[He] is a Canadian…born in a distant fortified outpost on the borders of Canada and America”.

Newspaper-Ontario
Credit: The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889). 7 February 1887. http://trove.nla.gov.au/

That’s quite different from her version. The American-Canadian border is found in other provinces besides Ontario. Thus her misquoting of the information was leading her astray. She had a mythical story of her great-grandfather being born in Ontario when in fact he might have been born in any one of several provinces that border on the United States. As well her use of “near the border” instead of the actual wording of “on the borders” makes a difference as to what locations fit the reference given (near vs on). It’s important to be accurate and precise when using quotes as a source.

Sources Can Be Misunderstood

Several years ago a friend asked me to help him find out where in Indiana his grandmother was born. His source for her birth was a family bible. But a check of the bible revealed that her parents were born and married in Ontario and all her siblings were recorded as being born in Ontario. All other records, such as census and death records gave her place of birth as Ontario. It seemed unlikely that she was born in the United States but what about the reference to Indiana? Further research revealed that there was a small village in Ontario called Indiana about 5 miles from where her parents were born and married and about 10 miles from the family’s location in various census records. My friend had misunderstood the original source.  

Keep This Mantra in Mind

When in doubt, remember....

"Genealogy without sources is mythology"

Don’t let your genealogy research be guided by mythology.


Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the
Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.

 

 


Power Platting: Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions - free webinar by Chris Staats now online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "Power Platting: Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions" by Chris Staats PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for a limited time. Some great comments:

  • This webinar was fantastic. Who would have thought an old woman would ever be interested in plotting? But hey, now I KNOW I can do it! Love Webinar Wednesdays!
  • Metes and Bounds simplified. Amazing!
  • Excellent webinar. Nice to learn technical stuff at a layman's level. Thank you!

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 54 minute recording of "Power Platting: Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - plat - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, August 17, 2015.

DmSpecial Offer on DeedMapper software

Through August 19, get the DeedMapper software for $20 off. Click here to purchase at full price, and the $20 will be refunded shortly thereafter. Must enter this code in the order notes: FTW3

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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors by Mark Lowe. August 19.
  • Digital Family Reunions by Devin Ashby. August 21.
  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!