Using the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Online Catalog for Research

  Using the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Online Catalog for Research


With the growing size of digital collections now available, an online catalog is simply no longer just a research tool. They are now online databases where you can do original research. I have used numerous online images from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) catalog in past Legacy News posts as examples of documents that may include an ancestor. There are over four million images and digital objects in NARA’s catalog, a number that grows frequently, so it’s certainly worthwhile to at least check this site when researching. There’s great potential to find a lot of gems.

Before digging, I’d like to help you navigate NARA’s catalog and provide some tips on how to make the most of it. The NARA homepage presents users with the main search engine where you can start with a few keywords, such as a topic or even someone’s name.

Each time you click on a catalog entry in your search, you are presented with a page that has important descriptive information. The catalog is a research tool because you should consult this before doing in-person research to find relevant sources and create a research plan. Each catalog entry has:

  1. Record Group information
  2. ID number for that entry
  3. Microfilm publication number if the collection has been microfilmed
  4. The branch of NARA that has custody of the archived record and it’s contact information

National Archives Catalog Search

Fig 1 & 2. Screenshots of the information held in an online catalog entry for NARA. 
Fig 1 & 2. Screenshots of the information held in an online catalog entry for NARA. 


Remember that names will only appear in the catalog if they are included in the title or description. General keyword searches can present users with an overwhelming number of results, so using the refining tools allows us to focus on relevant entries.

All the refining tools are on the left side of the page. Limiting to only digital objects and images can be done on the top left under “Refine By: Data” and clicking “Archival Descriptions with Digital Objects.” To the right of these filters are additional filters where you can restrict results to only Images, Documents, Web Pages, and more. If a user is looking for records in a particular branch of NARA, this can be accomplished by clicking one of the locations under “Refine By: Location.” The advanced search, which is located to the right of the search bar offers even more refining tools. People who are acquainted with the division and hierarchy of record groups at NARA might want to try limiting results to a particular RG number. Users can also search for "tags" put on documents by other users. NARA's catalog offers crowdsourcing capabilities where users can tag and transcribe documents in the catalog. Any user can make a free account to do this as well as save their searches and specific entries. [1] 

Military records from the Revolutionary War to the late 20th century are available on NARA’s catalog. A favorite of genealogists would have to be the illustrated family records or frakturs from the Revolutionary War pension applications. There’s a little over 100 of these that were submitted as documentation for claimants and their families. Virginia patriot Dawson Cooke’s claim for service includes pages from the family bible of John Newcomb. The Newcombs were friends and associates of Dawson Cooke and his first wife Mildred. It includes four pages of genealogical information of not just the Newcomb and his descendants, but also a memorandum of the births of other families, who happened to be the Newcomb's family property.

 

Fig 3. Memorandum of the births of slaves of Joanna Newcomb from Dawson Cooke's Revolutionary War Pension File (National Archives and Records Administration, NAID 7455382). 
Fig 3. Memorandum of the births of slaves of Joanna Newcomb from Dawson Cooke's Revolutionary War Pension File (National Archives and Records Administration, NAID 7455382). 

 There are also thousands of other records from NARA’s military series including:

  • Compiled service record cards
  • World War I & II Casualty Lists, i.e. State Summary of War Casualties (Navy, Marine Corps, & Coast Guard) and World War II Honor List of Dead and Missing Army Air Forces Personnel
  • Muster rolls
  • Unit records
  • Correspondence

Many of the documents are digitized because they were deemed historically significant and some of them invoke painful times in our history. Among the digitized records of the Boston Navy Yard is a 150 page file on casualties in the Coconut Grove fire of 1942 that killed 495 people, including 35 personnel of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.
 

Fig 4. Patients at Chelsea Naval Hospital following the Coconut Grove fire of 1942 [names removed for privacy purposes]. (National Archives and Records Administration, NAID 30623174)
Fig 4. Patients at Chelsea Naval Hospital following the Coconut Grove fire of 1942 [names removed for privacy purposes]. (National Archives and Records Administration, NAID 30623174)

 Among the number of other types of digitized records include:

  • Court cases
  • Naturalizations
  • Indian census rolls
  • Maritime logbooks and personnel documents
  • Lists of patients at government hospitals
  • Maps
  • ….and so much more.

There are some microfilm publications, in addition to the World War II casualty lists, like NARA M862, Numerical and Minor Files Of The Department of State, 1906-1910, which include all the records made and kept by United States diplomats and consuls for that time period.

More than 99% of over four million images reproduced in The National Archives and Records Administration’s online catalog are “government works” and therefore, in the public domain.[2] You can easily download a series of documents for free by clicking the .pdf link or one at a time in .jpg format. I think it’s easier to view the images after downloading them. There are a few which have copyright restrictions, mostly because the copyright title belongs to someone outside of the National Archives. You can scroll past the image to view details and it will note any access restrictions. The restrictions are not only pertaining to copyright, but also accessibility of the originals to the public. Even if there is a document or photo that doesn’t directly include an ancestor, it’s nice to know that genealogists can use them freely to assist in telling the stories of their ancestor or to educate others. 

Fig 5. "Clerical force & U.S. Deputy Marshalls, U.S. Land Office, Perry, OkIa. Ter. Oct. 12, 1893." (National Archives and Records Administration, NAID 516459). 
Fig 5. "Clerical force & U.S. Deputy Marshalls, U.S. Land Office, Perry, OkIa. Ter. Oct. 12, 1893." (National Archives and Records Administration, NAID 516459). 

Remember that the NARA catalog isn’t the first or only place you want to stop and try this. Look for all the possible archival repositories in the area of your research and look to see what they have online for special collections. You never know how it might pertain to your family history.

 

[1] For more information, see National Archives and Records Administration, "Using The Catalog," (https://www.archives.gov/research/catalog/help/using.html: accessed 16 Dec 2016). 

[2] See 17 U.S.C. § 105 (https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#105: accessed 16 Dec 2016). See also “Copyright” under “National Archives Frequently Asked Questions” (https://www.archives.gov/faqs: accessed 16 Dec 2016).

 ---

Jake Fletcher is a genealogist, lecturer, and blogger.  He currently serves as Vice President of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists (NEAPG).

 


Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research - free webinar by Lisa Louise Cooke now online for limited time

2017-01-18-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research" by Lisa Louise Cooke is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Learn how to find free digital maps for your ancestral locations, add them as permanent overlays to Google Earth, and then organize them into your personal map reference collection. You’ll learn best practices for keeping them organized and enriching your research.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 42 minute recording of "Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Webinar Coupon Code

Use webinar coupon code earth10 for 10% off anything in our online store including Legacy software, Legacy QuickGuides, webinar memberships and more. Coupon good through Monday, January 16, 2017.

Click here to browse the store.

Google_bundle_largeThe Google Toolbox Bundle - 43.95

The Genealogist's Google Toolbox, Second Edition print book and all 14 episodes of the Google Earth for Genealogy Video Series are available to you at one low cost. Both of these products are designed to guide and educate your journey through finding your family history and virtually walking in your ancestors foot steps.

The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox includes:
  • Google Search: Get all the latest on how to get the best search results possible. New chapter on searching for common surnames!
  • Google Alerts: Yous personal genealogy assistant.
  • Gmail: Never lose another email. Expanded!
  • Google Books: The world’s history at your fingertips. Includes expanded instructions on using My Library.
  • Google Translate: Explore foreign language websites and documents.
  • YouTube: Find your family history in action on video. And all new: Build your own free YouTube channel.
  • Brand new chapters on Google Scholar and Google Patents!
  • Google Earth: Rock your ancestor’s world!
Published 2015, Perfect-bound Paperback: 203 pages, 8.5" x 11", black and white with illustrations

Google Earth for Genealogy: Video Series includes
Previously on CD, now as a digital download!

Learn how to use Google Earth for genealogy in new and exciting ways! This set of tutorial videos by nationally known genealogist Lisa Louise Cooke brings you over 2 1/2 hours of easy-to-follow instructions. You'll be blown away at what you can do with Google Earth, and Lisa's project ideas will give your family members a new perspective and appreciation of family history.
 
Explore all 14 episodes!
  • Download and use Google Earth
  • Identify the locations of old photographs Part 1
  • Identify the locations of old photographs Part 2
  • Explore church record origins
  • Plot your ancestors' homesteads
  • Create your own custom historic map overlays
  • Save and share Google Earth images
  • Pinpoint Your Ancestors Property
  • Locate Original Land Surveys
  • Customize Place Marks and Add Photographs
  • Add Videos to Maps
  • Add Focus with Polygons and Paths
  • Incorporate 3D Models of Ancestral Locations
  • Create and Share family History Tours 
image from news.legacyfamilytree.com

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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Playing Nice In The Genealogy Sandbox by Thomas MacEntee. January 25.
  • Photography for Genealogy by Nicka Smith. February 1.
  • The WHO of Genetic Genealogy by Blaine Bettinger. February 8.
  • Deciphering German Script by Gail Blankenau. February 10.
  • Be Your Own Digital Archivist: Preserve Your Research by Cyndi Ingle. February 15.
  • Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument by Karen Stanbary, CG. February 21.
  • Finding Missing Persons With DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. February 22.
  • Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. March 1.
  • 50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know by Gena Philibert-Ortega. March 8.
  • Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips by Cari Taplin, CG. March 10.
  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. March 15.
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


BCG Webinar - Writing Up Your Research - now online for limited time

  BCG Webinar - Writing Up Your Research


The recording of Tuesday's webinar by Michael Leclerc and the Board for Certification of Genealogists, "Writing Up Your Research" is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com/BCG for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Writing up our research is the best way to preserve it. We will examine different ways of writing and publishing, from blogs to books.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 26 minute recording of "Writing Up Your Research" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

STDTrans200Genealogy Standards - 12.95

"Accuracy is fundamental to genealogical research. Without it, a family's history would be fiction. This manual presents the standards family historians use to obtain valid results.
 
These standards apply to all genealogical research, whether shared privately or published. They also apply to personal research for clients, courts, and other employers. The standards address documentation; research planning and execution, including reasoning from evidence; compiling research results; genealogical education; and ongoing development of genealogical knowledge and skills.
 
BCG [Board for Certification of Genealogists] offers these standards to the field as a guide to sound genealogical research and a way to assess the research outcomes that genealogists produce. They are standards for anyone who seeks to research and portray accurately people's lives, relationships, and histories.
 
Family historians depend upon thousands of people unknown to them. They exchange research with others; copy information from books and databases; and write libraries, societies, and government offices. At times they even hire professionals to do legwork in distant areas and trust strangers to solve important problems. But how can a researcher be assured that he or she is producing or receiving reliable results? This new edition of the official manual from the Board of Certification for Genealogists provides a standard by which all genealogists can pattern their work.
 
Paperback: 100 pages, 5.5" x 8.5"
 


Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 466 classes, 646 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,148 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research by Lisa Louise Cooke. January 18.
  • Playing Nice In The Genealogy Sandbox by Thomas MacEntee. January 25.
  • Photography for Genealogy by Nicka Smith. February 1.
  • The WHO of Genetic Genealogy by Blaine Bettinger. February 8.
  • Deciphering German Script by Gail Blankenau. February 10.
  • Be Your Own Digital Archivist: Preserve Your Research by Cyndi Ingle. February 15.
  • Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument by Karen Stanbary, CG. February 21.
  • Finding Missing Persons With DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. February 22.
  • Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. March 1.
  • 50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know by Gena Philibert-Ortega. March 8.
  • Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips by Cari Taplin, CG. March 10.
  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. March 15.
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Wednesday: Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research by Lisa Louise Cooke

Register

Learn how to find free digital maps for your ancestral locations, add them as permanent overlays to Google Earth, and then organize them into your personal map reference collection. You’ll learn best practices for keeping them organized and enriching your research. 

Join us and Lisa Louise Cooke for the live webinar Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

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No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

LisaLouiseCooke-144x144Lisa Louise Cooke is the owner of Genealogy Gems, a genealogy and family history multi-media company.  She is producer and host of the Genealogy Gems Podcast, the popular online genealogy audio show as well as the Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcast, both available at www.GenealogyGems.com, in iTunes, and through the Genealogy Gems app. Her podcast episodes bring genealogy news, research strategies, expert interviews and inspiration to genealogists and have been downloaded over 1 million times.

Lisa is the author of a variety of multi-media materials available to Genealogy Gems Premium Members and the books: Turn Your iPad into a Genealogy Powerhouse, How to Find Your Family History in Newspapers, The Genealogist's Google Toolbox, and Genealogy Gems: Ultimate Research Strategies, as well as producer of the video series Google Earth for Genealogy and over 60 videos at the Genealogy Gems YouTube Channel.

Lisa's offerings are not limited to online.  She is a sought after international genealogy speaker having regularly appeared at Who Do You Think You Are? Live in London, and webinar presenter.

Whether in person or online, Lisa strives to dig through the myriad of genealogy news, questions and resources and deliver the gems that can unlock each listeners own family history treasure trove!

Family is not just a priority professionally. Lisa is a doting wife to Bill, the proud mom of three daughters, and has added the role of Grandma to her resume.  She counts her blessings every day for the love, fulfillment and laughter that family brings to every aspect of her life.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Legacy Genealogy Cruise 2017 announced! Pacific Coast - September 22-29, 2017

image from www.legacyfamilytree.comThe 14th annual Legacy Genealogy Cruise, to be held September 22-29, 2017, departs from Seattle, Washington aboard Royal Caribbean's Explorer of the Seas ship and will feature top genealogy speakers including members of the Legacy Family Tree staff. We will cruise the Pacific Coast and visit the following ports:

  • Seattle, WA
  • Astoria, OR
  • San Francisco, CA
  • Victoria, British Columbia

Genealogy Classes at Sea
While at sea attend classes taught by some of genealogy's finest educators, Legacy Family Tree webinar speakers, and Legacy developers. In addition to the classes, you will benefit from the small-group sessions and lots of time to learn from each other.

The Ship

Is it adventure you seek, or a restful retreat from life on land? Royal Caribbean's Explorer of the Seas® is home to an array of innovations that give you whatever type of vacation you desire. Catch a wave on the FlowRider® surf simulator, or climb a rock wall that overlooks the sea. Find your adventure on the basketball court, ice-skating rink or mini-golf course. If it's zen you seek, achieve it poolside or at the relaxing VitalitySM Spa. Liven up your nights on the Royal Promenade, with parades, dancing, and duty-free shopping deals. Enjoy spacious public areas, enhanced staterooms, new virtual balconies, and a spectacular three-story dining room with new dining experiences, this ship has room for your whole crew.

Reservations or questions
Prices begin at $428 per person, based on double occupancy. The price includes:

  • Genealogy classes
  • Shipboard accommodations
  • Ocean transportation
  • Meals
  • Some beverages
  • Most onboard entertainment

Transportation to Seattle, port charges, gratuities, government fees/taxes, and optional tours are extra.

Click here to learn more or to securely book your cruise online.

To reserve a cabin, or ask questions, contact our travel coordinator, Christy, at 1-425-222-6222 or send an email to LegacyFamilyTreeCruise@gmail.com.

More Information

For class descriptions, frequently asked questions, descriptions of the places we'll visit, or pictures of our past cruises, visit http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/CruiseInfo_2017.asp.


Writing Up Your Research - Register for Tuesday's BCG webinar by Michael J. Leclerc, CG

Register

image from familytreewebinars.comWriting up our research is the best way to preserve it. We will examine different ways of writing and publishing, from blogs to books.

This webinar is hosted and sponsored by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

Join BCG and Michael J. Leclerc, CG for the live webinar Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 8pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

MichaelLeclerc-144x144Michael J. Leclerc, CG is an internationally renowned genealogist. He has authored numerous articles for genealogy magazines and scholarly journals, and is a popular presenter at conferences and seminars around the world. Michael worked in a variety of capacities at the New England Historic Genealogical Society for 17 years prior to joining Mocavo as Chief Genealogist in 2012. He left there in 2015 to start Genealogy Professor (www.genprof.net), where he helps to provide genealogy education opportunities to family historians. He has edited several books, including Genealogical Writing in the 21st Century: A Guide to Register Style and More, Second Edition, with Henry Hoff, and the fifth edition of the seminal guidebook Genealogist's Handbook for New England Research. He was a contributing editor for American Ancestors magazine, and a consulting editor for The New England Historical and Genealogical Register. Michael has served on the boards of the Association of Professional Genealogists and the Federation of Genealogical Societies. You can reach him at www.mjleclerc.com and Facebook.com/michaeljleclerc.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at:

  • 8pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 7pm Central
  • 6pm Mountain
  • 5pm Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners - free webinar by Geoff Rasmussen now online

2017-01-13-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners" by Geoff Rasmussen is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Whether you are a brand new Legacy Family Tree user, or would like a beginning level refresher course, this class will help you become acquainted with the basics of this family tree software.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 42 minute recording of "Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Webinar Coupon Code

Use webinar coupon code beginner17 for 10% off anything in our online store including Legacy software, Legacy QuickGuides, webinar memberships and more. Coupon good through Monday, January 16, 2017.

Click here to browse the store.

BookLegacy Family Tree 9 Unlocked

Order the printed book and get the electronic (PDF) version of the book ($14.95 value) FREE! (instant download availability).
 
272 pages | Published Nov 2016 | Perfect-bound Paperback | 8.5" x 11" | Black/white
 
Anyone can use Legacy Family Tree. It is simple enough for the beginner and powerful enough for the experienced. Without this book, you will probably discover some of the more powerful Legacy tools on your own...eventually...but why wait? In Legacy Family Tree 9 - Unlocked! you will learn how to better utilize some of Legacy’s best features by shadowing the research process of professional genealogist and Legacy Family Tree developer, Geoff Rasmussen: 
  • Shared Events
  • Sources, SourceWriter, and the Source Clipboard
  • To Do List
  • Family Mapping
  • Chronology View and the Chronology Comparison Report (new in v9!)
  • Why and how to add unlinked individuals
  • Brand new Find A Grave tool (new in v9!)
  • Quick Access Toolbar
  • Brand new Hashtag tool (new in v9!)
  • Media Relinker
  • The hidden FamilySearch Export button
  • Digital pictures and other media
  • Much more...
This book is for genealogists and Legacy Family Tree 9 users of all expertise. All levels of genealogists benefit from learning about how others do research. Long time Legacy users will enjoy the insights into the advanced features (especially the Chronology Comparison Tool!) and little tips and tricks along the way. Beginning Legacy users will not only begin to grasp what is possible in Legacy but they will learn to “do it right the first time.”
 
Not only will you learn how to use Legacy, but you will learn how to use it in the context of real genealogical research situations. This book is based on the more-popular-than-he-ever-dreamed-of “Watch Geoff Live” webinar series, meaning, it was written live and unscripted. Geoff explained, “As I researched my ancestor, John Williams, I wrote down every thought, decision and step-by-step procedure as I went. I included examples and screenshots of how I added: 
  • Online documents
  • Online databases
  • Census records
  • Probate records
  • Obituaries
  • Death certificates
  • Email correspondence
...to Legacy Family Tree. The instructions can serve as a template to guide genealogists and Legacy users through their own research and use of Legacy.”
 
As you contemplate, adapt, and apply the research and data entry procedures from this book, you will have more time to find your ancestors. With the new skills you gain about how to better use Legacy Family Tree, you will be more prepared, organized and better equipped to find those challenging ancestors.
 
image from news.legacyfamilytree.com

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 465 classes, 645 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,138 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Writing Up Your Research by Michael J. Leclerc, CG. January 17.
  • Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research by Lisa Louise Cooke. January 18.
  • Playing Nice In The Genealogy Sandbox by Thomas MacEntee. January 25.
  • Photography for Genealogy by Nicka Smith. February 1.
  • The WHO of Genetic Genealogy by Blaine Bettinger. February 8.
  • Deciphering German Script by Gail Blankenau. February 10.
  • Be Your Own Digital Archivist: Preserve Your Research by Cyndi Ingle. February 15.
  • Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument by Karen Stanbary, CG. February 21.
  • Finding Missing Persons With DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. February 22.
  • Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. March 1.
  • 50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know by Gena Philibert-Ortega. March 8.
  • Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips by Cari Taplin, CG. March 10.
  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. March 15.
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Top 20 Webinars of All Time - #s 5-1

Top 20 Webinars of All Time - #s 5-1


Finally we've arrived to the last five webinars  in our all time list! Today we bring you #s 5-1 - the top five webinars of all time so far. 

No surprise when we look at #1! And best of all, four of the top 5 are free for everyone to watch all the time! Just click the image.

Here are  the top 10-6 of all time:

#5

Digital Research Guidance, Research Logs, and To Do Lists: FamilySearch, Research Wiki, and Legacy Family Tree

 

#4  

Get Organized Using the FamilyRoots Organizer Color-Coding System


#3 

7 Unique Technologies for Genealogy Discoveries at MyHeritage


#2

Legacy Family Tree and FamilySearch Family Tree


#1

Sources and Citations Made Simple, Standard, and Powerful


Look at our lineup of speakers for 2017! All live webinars are free to watch.

2017speakers

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.


Top 20 Webinars of All Time - #s 10-6

  Top 20 Legacy Webinars of All Time - #s 10-6


We're getting very close to number one in our count down of the Top 20 of all time! Today we bring you #s 10-6. 

We've got just one more days left in our countdown! The top 5 being announced during Friday's webinar - Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners.

Here are  the top 10-6 of all time:

#10 

What's New at FamilySearch

 

#9  

Using Evernote for Genealogy


#8 

The Paper-Less Genealogist


#7

Microsoft Word Series - #1 Getting Started with Microsoft Word


#6

My Genealogy DO-Over - A Year of Learning from Research Mistakes


Look at our lineup of speakers for 2017! All live webinars are free to watch.

2017speakers

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.


Tips and Tricks to Organizing Your Genealogy - free webinar by Shannon Combs-Bennett now online

Tips and Tricks to Organizing Your Genealogy

The recording of Wednesday's webinar, "Tips and Tricks to Organizing Your Genealogy" by Shannon Combs-Bennett is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Most researchers admit that organizing and keeping up with their "stuff" is one of the most challenging aspects of research. Learn several techniques to keep you organized and on top of your files so you know exactly where everything is.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 33 minute recording of "Tips and Tricks to Organizing Your Genealogy" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Webinar Coupon Code

Use webinar coupon code organize17 for 10% off anything in our online store including Legacy software, Legacy QuickGuides, webinar memberships and more. Coupon good through Monday, January 16, 2017.

Click here to browse the store.

 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 463 classes, 642 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,134 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners by Geoff Rasmussen. January 13.
  • Writing Up Your Research by Michael J. Leclerc, CG. January 17.
  • Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research by Lisa Louise Cooke. January 18.
  • Playing Nice In The Genealogy Sandbox by Thomas MacEntee. January 25.
  • Photography for Genealogy by Nicka Smith. February 1.
  • The WHO of Genetic Genealogy by Blaine Bettinger. February 8.
  • Deciphering German Script by Gail Blankenau. February 10.
  • Be Your Own Digital Archivist: Preserve Your Research by Cyndi Ingle. February 15.
  • Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument by Karen Stanbary, CG. February 21.
  • Finding Missing Persons With DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. February 22.
  • Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. March 1.
  • 50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know by Gena Philibert-Ortega. March 8.
  • Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips by Cari Taplin, CG. March 10.
  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. March 15.
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Friday - Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners by Geoff Rasmussen

Register

Whether you are a brand new Legacy Family Tree user, or would like a beginning level refresher course, this class will help you become acquainted with the basics of this family tree software.

Join us and Geoff Rasmussen for the live webinar Friday, January 13, 2017 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

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Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

GeoffRasmussen-144x144Geoffrey D. Rasmussen is the father of four budding genealogists. He graduated with a degree in Genealogy and Family History from Brigham Young University and has served as director and vice-president of the Utah Genealogical Association. He is a dynamic genealogy speaker on all forms of genealogy technology, and as host of the Legacy Family Tree webinar series, has spoken virtually to nearly 100 different countries. He has authored books, videos, articles, and websites, and develops the Legacy Family Tree software program. On a personal note, Geoff enjoys playing the piano, organ, cello, basketball and bowling. His favorite places are cemeteries, the ocean, and hanging out with other genealogists. He met and proposed to his wife in a Family History Center.

He is the author of the recently-released, Kindred Voices: Listening for our Ancestors, and the popular books Legacy Family Tree, Unlocked! and Digital Imaging Essentials.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Friday, January 13, 2017 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Top 20 Webinars of All Time - #s 15-11

  Top 20 Webinars of All Time - #s 15-11


We're counting our way down to number one of the Top 20 Legacy Webinars of all time! Today we bring you #s 15-11. 

Please note that there are two webinars featured here that are always free! Everyone is free to watch them.

We've got two more days left in our countdown with the top 5 being announced during Friday's webinar - Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners.

Here are  the top 15-11 of all time:

#15 

Alltime-15

 

#14  

Alltime-19


#13 

Alltime-13


#12

Alltime-12


#11

Alltime-11


Look at our lineup of speakers for 2017! All live webinars are free to watch.

2017speakers

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.


Top 20 Webinars of All Time - #s 20-16

Top 20 Webinars of All Time - #s 20-16

Recently we shared with you the Top 10 Webinars of 2016. What a great list of classes and a reminder of the variety of topics we covered in 2016.

We've been doing webinars now since 2010. In 6 years we've released  over 460 classes! That amounts to 640 hours of genealogy instruction.

Curious about which webinars made it into the all-time Top 20? We'll share the entire list over the next four days.

Here are  the top 20-16 of all time:

#20 

Alltime-20

 

#19  

Alltime-19


#18 

Alltime-18


#17 

Alltime-17


#16 

Alltime-16

 

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2017! All live webinars are free to watch.

2017speakers

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.


Tuesday Tip - Backup vs. Save As

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

  Tuesday's Tip - Backup vs. Save As


Many people get confused between the options of Saving Legacy, Backing up Legacy and using the Save As command. This overview will clarify the three commands.

Saving Legacy

Legacy saves your file on the fly. When you close your file everything has been saved. When you open Legacy, this file will open on your screen. I highly recommend you tell Legacy to do this by going to OPTIONS > CUSTOMIZE > GENERAL SETTINGS . In Option 1.2 pick the 1st or 3rd option. If you only have one file then pick the 3rd so that there is no question.

Backing Up Legacy

You should also backup your file on a regular basis. You will rarely if ever need to restore a backup. In 11 years I have only had to restore a backup one time and that is when I had a hard drive failure. You should save your backups somewhere other than your hard drive for that very reason.

Save As

There is a SAVE AS command. What this does is it saves an exact copy of your database file. There are reasons that you might do this but the average user will not/should not use this command.

Why am I telling you this? We get emails all the time from people that have been restoring backups every single time they open Legacy. We have people that use the Save As command instead of backing up. These people end up with hundreds of Legacy files on their computer and if they open the wrong one they email us in a panic because they say that all of the data they added yesterday or last week or last month is suddenly gone.

A clue that you have been doing one of the above is that you will see file names with numbers behind them in brackets or parentheses or they word "copy" in parenthesis.

When we tell people to search their entire hard drive for .fdb files (the Windows command is *.fdb) they are sometimes quite surprised by what they find.

Most people should only have two .fdb files on their computer, their working family file and the Sample file that comes with Legacy. There are people that have more than one file though, the One-Name Study people and the One-Place Study people for example. Also those people that are professional genealogists and do client work will have an .fdb file for each client. There are some people that have their side in one file and their spouse's side in another but we really don't recommend that.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.